↓ Skip to main content

The puzzle of monogamous marriage

Overview of attention for article published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, March 2012
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#6 of 5,285)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
19 news outlets
blogs
11 blogs
twitter
430 tweeters
facebook
8 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
5 Google+ users
reddit
12 Redditors
video
4 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
132 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
436 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The puzzle of monogamous marriage
Published in
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, March 2012
DOI 10.1098/rstb.2011.0290
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joseph Henrich, Robert Boyd, Peter J. Richerson

Abstract

The anthropological record indicates that approximately 85 per cent of human societies have permitted men to have more than one wife (polygynous marriage), and both empirical and evolutionary considerations suggest that large absolute differences in wealth should favour more polygynous marriages. Yet, monogamous marriage has spread across Europe, and more recently across the globe, even as absolute wealth differences have expanded. Here, we develop and explore the hypothesis that the norms and institutions that compose the modern package of monogamous marriage have been favoured by cultural evolution because of their group-beneficial effects-promoting success in inter-group competition. In suppressing intrasexual competition and reducing the size of the pool of unmarried men, normative monogamy reduces crime rates, including rape, murder, assault, robbery and fraud, as well as decreasing personal abuses. By assuaging the competition for younger brides, normative monogamy decreases (i) the spousal age gap, (ii) fertility, and (iii) gender inequality. By shifting male efforts from seeking wives to paternal investment, normative monogamy increases savings, child investment and economic productivity. By increasing the relatedness within households, normative monogamy reduces intra-household conflict, leading to lower rates of child neglect, abuse, accidental death and homicide. These predictions are tested using converging lines of evidence from across the human sciences.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 430 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 436 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 11 3%
United Kingdom 8 2%
Spain 2 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
France 2 <1%
Italy 2 <1%
Israel 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Other 10 2%
Unknown 396 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 89 20%
Researcher 73 17%
Student > Bachelor 69 16%
Student > Master 59 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 26 6%
Other 97 22%
Unknown 23 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 95 22%
Psychology 90 21%
Social Sciences 86 20%
Arts and Humanities 17 4%
Computer Science 16 4%
Other 85 19%
Unknown 47 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 566. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 September 2020.
All research outputs
#19,040
of 16,079,906 outputs
Outputs from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#6
of 5,285 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#80
of 220,442 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#1
of 65 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,079,906 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,285 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 220,442 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 65 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.