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Processing of tactile information by the hippocampus

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, November 2007
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Title
Processing of tactile information by the hippocampus
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, November 2007
DOI 10.1073/pnas.0708611104
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. Pereira, S. Ribeiro, M. Wiest, L. C. Moore, J. Pantoja, S.-C. Lin, M. A. L. Nicolelis

Abstract

The ability to detect unusual events occurring in the environment is essential for survival. Several studies have pointed to the hippocampus as a key brain structure in novelty detection, a claim substantiated by its wide access to sensory information through the entorhinal cortex and also distinct aspects of its intrinsic circuitry. Novelty detection is implemented by an associative match-mismatch algorithm involving the CA1 and CA3 hippocampal subfields that compares the stream of sensory inputs received by CA1 to the stored representation of spatiotemporal sequences in CA3. In some rodents, including the rat, the highly sensitive facial whiskers are responsible for providing accurate tactile information about nearby objects. Surprisingly, however, not much is known about how inputs from the whiskers reach CA1 and how they are processed therein. Using concurrent multielectrode neuronal recordings and chemical inactivation in behaving rats, we show that trigeminal inputs from the whiskers reach the CA1 region through thalamic and cortical relays associated with discriminative touch. Ensembles of hippocampal neurons also carry precise information about stimulus identity when recorded during performance in an aperture-discrimination task using the whiskers. We also found broad similarities between tactile responses of trigeminal stations and the hippocampus during different vigilance states (wake and sleep). Taken together, our results show that tactile information associated with fine whisker discrimination is readily available to the hippocampus for dynamic updating of spatial maps.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 168 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 3%
Brazil 5 3%
United Kingdom 4 2%
France 2 1%
Chile 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Other 2 1%
Unknown 145 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 49 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 39 23%
Student > Master 17 10%
Student > Bachelor 14 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 12 7%
Other 24 14%
Unknown 13 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 73 43%
Neuroscience 24 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 11%
Psychology 12 7%
Engineering 7 4%
Other 14 8%
Unknown 20 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 June 2016.
All research outputs
#10,957,309
of 12,364,927 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#75,320
of 77,321 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#238,674
of 284,996 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#893
of 929 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,364,927 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 77,321 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 929 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.