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Abundance of water bodies is critical to guide mosquito larval control interventions and predict risk of mosquito-borne diseases

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, June 2013
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Title
Abundance of water bodies is critical to guide mosquito larval control interventions and predict risk of mosquito-borne diseases
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, June 2013
DOI 10.1186/1756-3305-6-179
Pubmed ID
Authors

Denis Valle, Benjamin Zaitchik, Beth Feingold, Keith Spangler, William Pan

Abstract

Characterization of mosquito breeding habitats is often accomplished with the goal of guiding larval control interventions as well as the goal of identifying areas with higher disease risk. This characterization often relies on statistical measures of association (e.g., regression coefficients) between covariates and presence/absence or abundance of larva. Here we contend that these measures of association are not enough; researchers should also study the spatial and temporal distribution of water bodies. We provide recommendations on how current methodology may be improved to adequately take into account the distribution of water bodies.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 6%
Ecuador 1 3%
Unknown 28 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 23%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 10%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Student > Master 2 6%
Other 8 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 42%
Unspecified 7 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 19%
Environmental Science 3 10%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Other 1 3%