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Experimental drought in a tropical rain forest increases soil carbon dioxide losses to the atmosphere

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology, August 2010
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Title
Experimental drought in a tropical rain forest increases soil carbon dioxide losses to the atmosphere
Published in
Ecology, August 2010
DOI 10.1890/09-1582.1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cory C. Cleveland, William R. Wieder, Sasha C. Reed, Alan R. Townsend, Cleveland, Cory C, Wieder, William R, Reed, Sasha C, Townsend, Alan R

Abstract

Climate models predict precipitation changes for much of the humid tropics, yet few studies have investigated the potential consequences of drought on soil carbon (C) cycling in this important biome. In wet tropical forests, drought could stimulate soil respiration via overall reductions in soil anoxia, but previous research suggests that litter decomposition is positively correlated with high rainfall fluxes that move large quantities of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the litter layer to the soil surface. Thus, reduced rainfall could also limit C delivery to the soil surface, reducing respiration rates. We conducted a throughfall manipulation experiment to investigate how 25% and 50% reductions in rainfall altered both C movement into soils and the effects of those DOM fluxes on soil respiration rates. In response to the experimental drought, soil respiration rates increased in both the -25% and -50% treatments. Throughfall fluxes were reduced by 26% and 55% in the -25% and -50% treatments, respectively. However, total DOM fluxes leached from the litter did not vary between treatments, because the concentrations of leached DOM reaching the soil surface increased in response to the simulated drought. Annual DOM concentrations averaged 7.7 +/- 0.8, 11.2 +/- 0.9, and 15.8 +/- 1.2 mg C/L in the control, -25%, and -50% plots, respectively, and DOM concentrations were positively correlated with soil respiration rates. A laboratory incubation experiment confirmed the potential importance of DOM concentration on soil respiration rates, suggesting that this mechanism could contribute to the increase in CO2 fluxes observed in the reduced rainfall plots. Across all plots, the data suggested that soil CO2 fluxes were partially regulated by the magnitude and concentration of soluble C delivered to the soil, but also by soil moisture and soil oxygen availability. Together, our data suggest that declines in precipitation in tropical rain forests could drive higher CO2 fluxes to the atmosphere both via increased soil 02 availability and through responses to elevated DOM concentrations.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 165 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 4%
Mexico 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 152 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 48 29%
Researcher 39 24%
Student > Master 19 12%
Student > Bachelor 10 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 6%
Other 27 16%
Unknown 12 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 68 41%
Environmental Science 52 32%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 8 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 1%
Other 9 5%
Unknown 23 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 November 2016.
All research outputs
#14,336,441
of 16,254,490 outputs
Outputs from Ecology
#5,736
of 5,876 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#221,727
of 267,926 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology
#121
of 126 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,254,490 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,876 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.7. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 126 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.