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Sharp decline of malaria cases in the Burie Zuria, Dembia, and Mecha districts, Amhara Region, Ethiopia, 2012–2014: descriptive analysis of surveillance data

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, February 2016
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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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4 Dimensions

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32 Mendeley
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Title
Sharp decline of malaria cases in the Burie Zuria, Dembia, and Mecha districts, Amhara Region, Ethiopia, 2012–2014: descriptive analysis of surveillance data
Published in
Malaria Journal, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1133-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yumi Toyama, Masaki Ota, Getinet Molla, Belay Bezabih Beyene

Abstract

In the Amhara Region of Ethiopia, a steep decline of malaria cases was seen in early 2014. This study verified the decrease of the malaria cases along with the positivity rates among acute febrile illness patients, from late 2012 through 2014 in selected districts of the Amhara Region of Federal Republic of Ethiopia. Descriptive epidemiological analysis was conducted on the routine malaria surveillance data from the World Health Organization epidemiological week 28 of 2012 to week 52 of 2014 in three districts: Burie Zuria, Dembia and Mecha, the Amhara Region in Ethiopia. The authors visited the three district health offices, and health centres, when necessary, and collected the surveillance data on malaria for that period. The study found that the malaria cases, along with the positivity rates, decreased from late 2012 to early 2014 in all three districts. Though the situation had slightly reverted in late 2014, the numbers of cases were much smaller than in late 2012 in all three districts. Despite the different diagnostic techniques used at health centres (malaria microscopy) and health posts (rapid diagnostic tests), moderate to high correlations were found, suggesting that the trends were real and not caused by a defect in the reagent, differences in the technicians' skills for microscopy, or a change of the health workers' attitudes toward cases with acute febrile illness. The decrease in malaria cases in early 2014 may have resulted from successful implementation of the three pillars of malaria control-case management, indoor residual spraying and insecticide-treated nets-in the districts where a high percentage of households were protected by indoor residual spraying and/or insecticide-treated nets. While the current efforts for malaria control should be strengthened and maintained, the review of malaria surveillance data should also be used to verify the malaria trend in the region.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ghana 1 3%
Unknown 31 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 31%
Researcher 5 16%
Student > Postgraduate 4 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Student > Bachelor 1 3%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Social Sciences 2 6%
Other 7 22%
Unknown 4 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 February 2016.
All research outputs
#8,132,922
of 13,495,558 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#2,800
of 3,934 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#132,277
of 266,458 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,495,558 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,934 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,458 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them