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Protection from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by polyclonal IgG requires adjuvant-induced inflammation

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neuroinflammation, January 2016
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3 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

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13 Mendeley
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Title
Protection from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by polyclonal IgG requires adjuvant-induced inflammation
Published in
Journal of Neuroinflammation, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12974-016-0506-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Quast, Isaak, Keller, Christian W, Weber, Patrick, Schneider, Christoph, von Gunten, Stephan, Lünemann, Jan D, Isaak Quast, Christian W. Keller, Patrick Weber, Christoph Schneider, Stephan von Gunten, Jan D. Lünemann

Abstract

Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) proved to be an efficient anti-inflammatory treatment for a growing number of neuroinflammatory diseases and protects against the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a widely used animal model for multiple sclerosis (MS). The clinical efficacy of IVIG and IVIG-derived F(ab')2 fragments, generated using the streptococcal cysteine proteinase Ide-S, was evaluated in EAE induced by active immunization and by adoptive transfer of myelin-specific T cells. Frequency, phenotype, and functional characteristics of T cell subsets and myeloid cells were determined by flow cytometry. Antibody binding to microbial antigen and cytokine production by innate immune cells was assessed by ELISA. We report that the protective effect of IVIG is lost in the adoptive transfer model of EAE and requires prophylactic administration during disease induction. IVIG-derived Fc fragments are not required for protection against EAE, since administration of F(ab')2 fragments fully recapitulated the clinical efficacy of IVIG. F(ab')2-treated mice showed a substantial decrease in splenic effector T cell expansion and cytokine production (GM-CSF, IFN-γ, IL-17A) 9 days after immunization. Inhibition of effector T cell responses was not associated with an increase in total numbers of Tregs but with decreased activation of innate myeloid cells such as neutrophils, monocytes, and dendritic cells. Therapeutically effective IVIG-derived F(ab')2 fragments inhibited adjuvant-induced innate immune cell activation as determined by IL-12/23 p40 production and recognized mycobacterial antigens contained in Freund's complete adjuvant which is required for induction of active EAE. Our data indicate that F(ab')2-mediated neutralization of adjuvant contributes to the therapeutic efficacy of anti-inflammatory IgG. These findings might partly explain the discrepancy of IVIG efficacy in EAE and MS.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 8%
Unknown 12 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 4 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 15%
Student > Master 2 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Other 3 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 4 31%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 15%
Computer Science 1 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 8%
Other 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 February 2016.
All research outputs
#3,296,818
of 7,306,657 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neuroinflammation
#418
of 945 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#127,716
of 284,228 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neuroinflammation
#25
of 52 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,306,657 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 52nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 945 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,228 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 52 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.