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Pretreatment with Ascorbic Acid Prevents Lethal Gastrointestinal Syndrome in Mice Receiving a Massive Amount of Radiation

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of radiation research, January 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#25 of 474)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
23 Mendeley
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Title
Pretreatment with Ascorbic Acid Prevents Lethal Gastrointestinal Syndrome in Mice Receiving a Massive Amount of Radiation
Published in
Journal of radiation research, January 2010
DOI 10.1269/jrr.09078
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tetsuo YAMAMOTO, Manabu KINOSHITA, Nariyoshi SHINOMIYA, Sadayuki HIROI, Hidekazu SUGASAWA, Yoshitaro MATSUSHITA, Takashi MAJIMA, Daizoh SAITOH, Shuhji SEKI, Yamamoto, Tetsuo, Kinoshita, Manabu, Shinomiya, Nariyoshi, Hiroi, Sadayuki, Sugasawa, Hidekazu, Matsushita, Yoshitaro, Majima, Takashi, Saitoh, Daizoh, Seki, Shuhji

Abstract

While bone marrow or stem cell transplantation can rescue bone marrow aplasia in patients accidentally exposed to a lethal radiation dose, radiation-induced irreversible gastrointestinal damage (GI syndrome) is fatal. We investigated the effects of ascorbic acid on radiation-induced GI syndrome in mice. Ascorbic acid (150 mg/kg/day) was orally administered to mice for 3 days, and then the mice underwent whole body irradiation (WBI). Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) 24 h after irradiation rescued mice receiving a WBI dose of less than 12 Gy. No mice receiving 14 Gy-WBI survived, because of radiation-induced GI syndrome, even if they received BMT. However, pretreatment with ascorbic acid significantly suppressed radiation-induced DNA damage in the crypt cells and prevented denudation of intestinal mucosa; therefore, ascorbic acid in combination with BMT rescued mice after 14 Gy-WBI. DNA microarray analysis demonstrated that irradiation up-regulated expressions of apoptosis-related genes in the small intestine, including those related to the caspase-9-mediated intrinsic pathway as well as the caspase-8-mediated extrinsic pathway, and down-regulated expressions of these genes in ascorbic acid-pretreated mice. Thus, pretreatment with ascorbic acid may effectively prevent radiation-induced GI syndrome.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 4%
Canada 1 4%
Unknown 21 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 35%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 17%
Other 2 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 9%
Professor 1 4%
Other 6 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 48%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 30%
Unspecified 1 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 4%
Other 2 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 May 2018.
All research outputs
#1,166,408
of 11,405,453 outputs
Outputs from Journal of radiation research
#25
of 474 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,490
of 265,360 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of radiation research
#1
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,405,453 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 474 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,360 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them