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Socially-marketed rapid diagnostic tests and ACT in the private sector: ten years of experience in Cambodia

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, August 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
policy
1 policy source
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
55 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
99 Mendeley
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Title
Socially-marketed rapid diagnostic tests and ACT in the private sector: ten years of experience in Cambodia
Published in
Malaria Journal, August 2011
DOI 10.1186/1475-2875-10-243
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shunmay Yeung, Edith Patouillard, Henrietta Allen, Duong Socheat

Abstract

Whilst some populations have recently experienced dramatic declines in malaria, the majority of those most at risk of Plasmodium falciparum malaria still lack access to effective treatment with artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) and others are already facing parasites resistant to artemisinins.In this context, there is a crucial need to improve both access to and targeting of ACT through greater availability of good quality ACT and parasitological diagnosis. This is an issue of increasing urgency notably in the private commercial sector, which, in many countries, plays an important role in the provision of malaria treatment. The Affordable Medicines Facility for malaria (AMFm) is a recent initiative that aims to increase the provision of affordable ACT in public, private and NGO sectors through a manufacturer-level subsidy. However, to date, there is little documented experience in the programmatic implementation of subsidized ACT in the private sector. Cambodia is in the unique position of having more than 10 years of experience not only in implementing subsidized ACT, but also rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) as part of a nationwide social marketing programme. The programme includes behaviour change communication and the training of private providers as well as the sale and distribution of Malarine, the recommended ACT, and Malacheck, the RDT. This paper describes and evaluates this experience by drawing on the results of household and provider surveys conducted since the start of the programme. The available evidence suggests that providers' and consumers' awareness of Malarine increased rapidly, but that of Malacheck much less so. In addition, improvements in ACT and RDT availability and uptake were relatively slow, particularly in more remote areas.The lack of standardization in the survey methods and the gaps in the data highlight the importance of establishing a clear system for monitoring and evaluation for similar initiatives. Despite these limitations, a number of important lessons can still be learnt. These include the importance of a comprehensive communications strategy and of a sustained and reliable supply of products, with attention to the geographical reach of both. Other important challenges relate to the difficulty in incentivising providers and consumers not only to choose the recommended drug, but to precede this with a confirmatory blood test and ensure that providers adhere to the test results and patients to the treatment regime. In Cambodia, this is particularly complicated due to problems inherent to the drug itself and the emergence of artemisinin resistance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 99 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 3%
Cambodia 1 1%
Pakistan 1 1%
Nigeria 1 1%
Unknown 93 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 24 24%
Researcher 17 17%
Student > Postgraduate 8 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 8%
Student > Bachelor 7 7%
Other 27 27%
Unknown 8 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 32 32%
Social Sciences 17 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 3%
Other 21 21%
Unknown 10 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 May 2018.
All research outputs
#1,297,436
of 14,572,831 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#307
of 4,207 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,809
of 212,063 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#5
of 123 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,572,831 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,207 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 212,063 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 123 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.