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Severe mammal declines coincide with proliferation of invasive Burmese pythons in Everglades National Park

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, January 2012
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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303 Mendeley
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2 CiteULike
Title
Severe mammal declines coincide with proliferation of invasive Burmese pythons in Everglades National Park
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, January 2012
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1115226109
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. E. Dorcas, J. D. Willson, R. N. Reed, R. W. Snow, M. R. Rochford, M. A. Miller, W. E. Meshaka, P. T. Andreadis, F. J. Mazzotti, C. M. Romagosa, K. M. Hart

Abstract

Invasive species represent a significant threat to global biodiversity and a substantial economic burden. Burmese pythons, giant constricting snakes native to Asia, now are found throughout much of southern Florida, including all of Everglades National Park (ENP). Pythons have increased dramatically in both abundance and geographic range since 2000 and consume a wide variety of mammals and birds. Here we report severe apparent declines in mammal populations that coincide temporally and spatially with the proliferation of pythons in ENP. Before 2000, mammals were encountered frequently during nocturnal road surveys within ENP. In contrast, road surveys totaling 56,971 km from 2003-2011 documented a 99.3% decrease in the frequency of raccoon observations, decreases of 98.9% and 87.5% for opossum and bobcat observations, respectively, and failed to detect rabbits. Road surveys also revealed that these species are more common in areas where pythons have been discovered only recently and are most abundant outside the python's current introduced range. These findings suggest that predation by pythons has resulted in dramatic declines in mammals within ENP and that introduced apex predators, such as giant constrictors, can exert significant top-down pressure on prey populations. Severe declines in easily observed and/or common mammals, such as raccoons and bobcats, bode poorly for species of conservation concern, which often are more difficult to sample and occur at lower densities.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 303 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 18 6%
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Kenya 1 <1%
Hungary 1 <1%
Romania 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 273 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 66 22%
Student > Bachelor 62 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 55 18%
Student > Master 44 15%
Unspecified 18 6%
Other 58 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 177 58%
Environmental Science 62 20%
Unspecified 23 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 3%
Psychology 6 2%
Other 26 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 350. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 September 2018.
All research outputs
#27,645
of 12,396,068 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#718
of 77,584 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#217
of 223,606 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#5
of 795 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,396,068 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 77,584 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 223,606 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 795 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.