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Bioaugmentation Mitigates the Impact of Estrogen on Coliform-Grazing Protozoa in Slow Sand Filters

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, March 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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39 Mendeley
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Title
Bioaugmentation Mitigates the Impact of Estrogen on Coliform-Grazing Protozoa in Slow Sand Filters
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, March 2016
DOI 10.1021/acs.est.5b05027
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah-Jane Haig, Caroline Gauchotte-Lindsay, Gavin Collins, Christopher Quince

Abstract

Exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), such as estrogens, is a growing issue for human and animal health as they have been shown to cause reproductive and developmental abnormalities in wildlife and plants, and have been linked to male infertility disorders in humans. Intensive farming, and weather events such as storms, flash flooding, and landslides, contribute estrogen to waterways used to supply drinking water. This paper explores the impact of estrogen exposure on the performance of slow sand filters (SSFs) used for water treatment. The feasibility and efficacy of SSF bioaugmentation with estrogen-degrading bacteria was also investigated, to determine whether removal of natural estrogens (estrone, estradiol and estriol) and overall SSF performance for drinking water treatment could be improved. Strains for SSF augmentation were isolated from full-scale, municipal SSFs so as to optimise survival in the laboratory-scale SSFs used. Concentrations of the natural estrogens, determined by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS), revealed augmented SSFs reduced the overall estrogenic potency of the supplied water by 25% on average, and removed significantly more estrone and estradiol than non-augmented filters. A negative correlation was found between coliform removal and estrogen concentration in non-augmented filters. This was due to the toxic inhibition of protozoa, indicating that high estrogen concentrations can have functional implications for SSFs (such as impairing coliform removal). Consequently, we suggest that high estrogen concentrations could impact significantly on water quality production, and in particular on pathogen removal in biological water filters.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 3%
Unknown 38 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 33%
Student > Master 6 15%
Student > Bachelor 5 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Lecturer 2 5%
Other 5 13%
Unknown 5 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 6 15%
Engineering 5 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 10%
Other 7 18%
Unknown 8 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 June 2016.
All research outputs
#3,605,250
of 12,577,568 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#4,765
of 12,757 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#83,058
of 266,975 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#92
of 219 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,577,568 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,757 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,975 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 219 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.