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Adaptive and Innate Immune Responsiveness to Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in Exposed Asymptomatic Children and Children with Previous Clinical Lyme Borreliosis

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical & Developmental Immunology, February 2012
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Title
Adaptive and Innate Immune Responsiveness to Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in Exposed Asymptomatic Children and Children with Previous Clinical Lyme Borreliosis
Published in
Clinical & Developmental Immunology, February 2012
DOI 10.1155/2012/294587
Pubmed ID
Authors

Barbro H. Skogman, Sandra Hellberg, Christina Ekerfelt, Maria C. Jenmalm, Pia Forsberg, Johnny Ludvigsson, Sven Bergström, Jan Ernerudh

Abstract

Why some individuals develop clinical manifestations in Lyme borreliosis (LB) while others remain asymptomatic is largely unknown. Therefore, we wanted to investigate adaptive and innate immune responsiveness to Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in exposed Borrelia-antibody-positive asymptomatic children (n = 20), children with previous clinical LB (n = 24), and controls (n = 20). Blood samples were analyzed for Borrelia-specific interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-4, and IL-17 secretion by ELISPOT and Borrelia-induced IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12(p70), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) secretion by Luminex. We found no significant differences in cytokine secretion between groups, but a tendency towards an increased spontaneous secretion of IL-6 was found among children with previous clinical LB. In conclusion, the adaptive or innate immune responsiveness to Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato was similar in Borrelia-exposed asymptomatic children and children with previous clinical LB. Thus, the immunological mechanisms of importance for eradicating the spirochete effectively without developing clinical manifestations of LB remain unknown.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Poland 2 5%
Germany 1 3%
United Kingdom 1 3%
Norway 1 3%
Netherlands 1 3%
Unknown 31 84%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 24%
Student > Master 6 16%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 11%
Other 10 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 46%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 32%
Unspecified 3 8%
Philosophy 1 3%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Other 3 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 October 2012.
All research outputs
#3,937,131
of 5,569,395 outputs
Outputs from Clinical & Developmental Immunology
#206
of 291 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,057
of 240,454 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical & Developmental Immunology
#61
of 87 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,569,395 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 291 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.7. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,454 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 87 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.