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Improving the ecological relevance of toxicity tests on scleractinian corals: Influence of season, life stage, and seawater temperature

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Pollution, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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47 Mendeley
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Title
Improving the ecological relevance of toxicity tests on scleractinian corals: Influence of season, life stage, and seawater temperature
Published in
Environmental Pollution, June 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.envpol.2016.01.086
Pubmed ID
Authors

Laetitia S. Hédouin, Ruth E. Wolf, Jeff Phillips, Ruth D. Gates

Abstract

Metal pollutants in marine systems are broadly acknowledged as deleterious: however, very little data exist for tropical scleractinian corals. We address this gap by investigating how life-history stage, season and thermal stress influence the toxicity of copper (Cu) and lead (Pb) in the coral Pocillopora damicornis. Our results show that under ambient temperature, adults and larvae appear to tolerate exposure to unusually high levels of copper (96 h-LC50 ranging from 167 to 251 μg Cu L(-1)) and lead (from 477 to 742 μg Pb L(-1)). Our work also highlights that warmer conditions (seasonal and experimentally manipulated) reduce the tolerance of adults and larvae to Cu toxicity. Despite a similar trend observed for the response of larvae to Pb toxicity to experimentally induced increase in temperature, surprisingly adults were more resistant in warmer condition to Pb toxicity. In the summer adults were less resistant to Cu toxicity (96 h-LC50 = 175 μg L(-1)) than in the winter (251 μg L(-1)). An opposite trend was observed for the Pb toxicity on adults between summer and winter (96 h-LC50 of 742 vs 471 μg L(-1), respectively). Larvae displayed a slightly higher sensitivity to Cu and Pb than adults. An experimentally induced 3 °C increase in temperature above ambient decreased larval resistance to Cu and Pb toxicity by 23-30% (96 h-LC50 of 167 vs 129 μg Cu L(-1) and 681 vs 462 μg Pb L(-1)). Our data support the paradigm that upward excursions in temperature influence physiological processes in corals that play key roles in regulating metal toxicity. These influences are more pronounced in larva versus adult corals. These findings are important when contextualized climate change-driven warming in the oceans and highlight that predictions of ecological outcomes to metal pollutants will be improved by considering environmental context and the life stages of organism under study.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 30%
Researcher 10 21%
Unspecified 7 15%
Student > Bachelor 6 13%
Student > Master 4 9%
Other 6 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 43%
Environmental Science 14 30%
Unspecified 7 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Mathematics 1 2%
Other 3 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 February 2016.
All research outputs
#6,903,052
of 12,279,872 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Pollution
#1,749
of 3,929 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#126,847
of 288,020 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Pollution
#20
of 101 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,279,872 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,929 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,020 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 101 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.