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High-throughput proteomics reveal alarmins as amplifiers of tissue pathology and inflammation after spinal cord injury

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
13 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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33 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
66 Mendeley
Title
High-throughput proteomics reveal alarmins as amplifiers of tissue pathology and inflammation after spinal cord injury
Published in
Scientific Reports, February 2016
DOI 10.1038/srep21607
Pubmed ID
Authors

Athanasios Didangelos, Michele Puglia, Michaela Iberl, Candela Sanchez-Bellot, Bernd Roschitzki, Elizabeth J. Bradbury

Abstract

Spinal cord injury is characterized by acute cellular and axonal damage followed by aggressive inflammation and pathological tissue remodelling. The biological mediators underlying these processes are still largely unknown. Here we apply an innovative proteomics approach targeting the enriched extracellular proteome after spinal cord injury for the first time. Proteomics revealed multiple matrix proteins not previously associated with injured spinal tissue, including small proteoglycans involved in cell-matrix adhesion and collagen fibrillogenesis. Network analysis of transcriptomics and proteomics datasets uncovered persistent overexpression of extracellular alarmins that can trigger inflammation via pattern recognition receptors. In mechanistic experiments, inhibition of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) revealed the involvement of alarmins in inflammatory gene expression, which was found to be dominated by IL1 and NFκΒ signalling. Extracellular high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) was identified as the likely endogenous regulator of IL1 expression after injury. These data reveal a novel tissue remodelling signature and identify endogenous alarmins as amplifiers of the inflammatory response that promotes tissue pathology and impedes neuronal repair after spinal cord injury.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 3%
Chile 1 2%
Unknown 63 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 20%
Student > Master 12 18%
Researcher 10 15%
Other 8 12%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Other 17 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 27%
Neuroscience 15 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 17%
Unspecified 4 6%
Other 7 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 March 2016.
All research outputs
#1,165,441
of 11,256,737 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#9,386
of 48,029 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,905
of 294,925 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#678
of 3,142 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,256,737 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 48,029 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 294,925 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,142 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.