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Molecular and electrophysiological changes in the prefrontal cortex–amygdala–dorsal periaqueductal grey pathway during persistent pain state and fear-conditioned analgesia

Overview of attention for article published in Physiology & Behavior, October 2011
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Title
Molecular and electrophysiological changes in the prefrontal cortex–amygdala–dorsal periaqueductal grey pathway during persistent pain state and fear-conditioned analgesia
Published in
Physiology & Behavior, October 2011
DOI 10.1016/j.physbeh.2011.05.028
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ryan K. Butler, Linda Nilsson-Todd, Carine Cleren, Isabelle Léna, René Garcia, David P. Finn

Abstract

Fear-conditioned analgesia (FCA) is the reduction in pain responding which is expressed upon re-exposure to a context previously paired with an aversive stimulus. Projections along the prefrontal cortex (PFC)-amygdala-dorsal periaqueductal grey (dPAG) pathway may mediate FCA. However, there is a paucity of studies measuring both molecular and electrophysiological changes in this pathway in rats expressing persistent pain-related behaviour or FCA. Male Lister-hooded rats, with stimulating and recording electrodes implanted in the amygdala and dPAG, respectively, either received or did not receive footshock (0.4 mA) paired with context, followed 23.5 h later by an intraplantar injection of saline or formalin (50 μL, 2.5%) into the right hindpaw. Thirty minutes post-formalin/saline, rats were re-exposed to the context for 15 min, during which pain-related behaviours were assessed in addition to evoked field potential recordings in the amygdala-dPAG pathway. Immediately after the 15-minute trial, PFC tissue was isolated for measurement of total and phosphorylated extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) by western blotting. Formalin-evoked nociceptive behaviour in non-fear-conditioned rats was associated with increased field potential amplitude in the dPAG and increased relative expression of phospho-ERK in the PFC. These effects were abolished in rats expressing FCA. Fear conditioning in non-formalin treated rats was associated with increased phospho-ERK in the PFC but no change in field potential amplitude in the dPAG. Together, these data suggest differential, state-dependent alterations in electrophysiological activity and ERK phosphorylation along the PFC-amygdala-dPAG pathway during pain, conditioned fear, and FCA.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 4%
Spain 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 49 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 37%
Researcher 6 11%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Professor 3 6%
Other 12 22%
Unknown 4 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 17 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 22%
Psychology 10 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 2%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 6 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 February 2012.
All research outputs
#3,732,772
of 5,301,541 outputs
Outputs from Physiology & Behavior
#1,311
of 1,694 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#148,912
of 238,904 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Physiology & Behavior
#27
of 39 outputs
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