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Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, January 2004
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#45 of 1,390)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
policy
3 policy sources
twitter
64 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
5 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
367 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
551 Mendeley
citeulike
4 CiteULike
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Title
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, January 2004
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-1-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mary Story, Simone French

Abstract

In recent years, the food and beverage industry in the US has viewed children and adolescents as a major market force. As a result, children and adolescents are now the target of intense and specialized food marketing and advertising efforts. Food marketers are interested in youth as consumers because of their spending power, their purchasing influence, and as future adult consumers. Multiple techniques and channels are used to reach youth, beginning when they are toddlers, to foster brand-building and influence food product purchase behavior. These food marketing channels include television advertising, in-school marketing, product placements, kids clubs, the Internet, toys and products with brand logos, and youth-targeted promotions, such as cross-selling and tie-ins. Foods marketed to children are predominantly high in sugar and fat, and as such are inconsistent with national dietary recommendations. The purpose of this article is to examine the food advertising and marketing channels used to target children and adolescents in the US, the impact of food advertising on eating behavior, and current regulation and policies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 64 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 551 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 7 1%
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Portugal 2 <1%
France 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Other 7 1%
Unknown 523 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 159 29%
Student > Master 117 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 69 13%
Unspecified 57 10%
Researcher 42 8%
Other 107 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 80 15%
Unspecified 74 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 71 13%
Business, Management and Accounting 69 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 58 11%
Other 199 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 103. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 November 2019.
All research outputs
#161,504
of 13,763,705 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#45
of 1,390 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,388
of 210,387 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#4
of 41 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,763,705 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,390 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 210,387 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 41 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.