↓ Skip to main content

Different systolic blood pressure targets for people with history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack: PAST-BP (Prevention After Stroke—Blood Pressure) randomised controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in British Medical Journal, February 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
13 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
57 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Different systolic blood pressure targets for people with history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack: PAST-BP (Prevention After Stroke—Blood Pressure) randomised controlled trial
Published in
British Medical Journal, February 2016
DOI 10.1136/bmj.i708
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jonathan Mant, Richard J McManus, Andrea Roalfe, Kate Fletcher, Clare J Taylor, Una Martin, Satnam Virdee, Sheila Greenfield, F D Richard Hobbs

Abstract

 To assess whether using intensive blood pressure targets leads to lower blood pressure in a community population of people with prevalent cerebrovascular disease.  Open label randomised controlled trial.  99 general practices in England, with participants recruited in 2009-11.  People with a history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack whose systolic blood pressure was 125 mm Hg or above.  Intensive systolic blood pressure target (<130 mm Hg or 10 mm Hg reduction from baseline if this was <140 mm Hg) or standard target (<140 mm Hg). Apart from the different target, patients in both arms were actively managed in the same way with regular reviews by the primary care team.  Change in systolic blood pressure between baseline and 12 months.  529 patients (mean age 72) were enrolled, 266 to the intensive target arm and 263 to the standard target arm, of whom 379 were included in the primary analysis (182 (68%) intensive arm; 197 (75%) standard arm). 84 patients withdrew from the study during the follow-up period (52 intensive arm; 32 standard arm). Mean systolic blood pressure dropped by 16.1 mm Hg to 127.4 mm Hg in the intensive target arm and by 12.8 mm Hg to 129.4 mm Hg in the standard arm (difference between groups 2.9 (95% confidence interval 0.2 to 5.7) mm Hg; P=0.03).  Aiming for target below 130 mm Hg rather than 140 mm Hg for systolic blood pressure in people with cerebrovascular disease in primary care led to a small additional reduction in blood pressure. Active management of systolic blood pressure in this population using a <140 mm Hg target led to a clinically important reduction in blood pressure.Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN29062286.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 1 2%
Japan 1 2%
Qatar 1 2%
Colombia 1 2%
Unknown 53 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 10 18%
Researcher 9 16%
Student > Master 8 14%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Professor 4 7%
Other 21 37%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 35 61%
Unspecified 6 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 7%
Design 2 4%
Other 6 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 42. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 July 2019.
All research outputs
#423,697
of 13,703,906 outputs
Outputs from British Medical Journal
#5,730
of 44,905 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,094
of 266,593 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Medical Journal
#155
of 976 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,703,906 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 44,905 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 30.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,593 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 976 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.