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Genotyping of Plasmodium vivax by minisatellite marker and its application in differentiating relapse and new infection

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, February 2016
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2 tweeters

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30 Mendeley
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Title
Genotyping of Plasmodium vivax by minisatellite marker and its application in differentiating relapse and new infection
Published in
Malaria Journal, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1139-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ram Das, Ramesh C. Dhiman, Deepali Savargaonkar, Anupkumar R. Anvikar, Neena Valecha

Abstract

Plasmodium vivax malaria is a major public health problem in India. Control of vivax malaria is challenging due to various factors including relapse which increase the burden significantly. There is no well studied marker to differentiate relapse from reinfection. This creates hindrance in search for anti-relapse medicines. The genomic study of minisatellite can help in characterization of relapse and new infection of vivax malaria. Eighty-eight samples of P. vivax were collected from malaria clinic. All the 14 chromosomes of P. vivax were scanned for minisatellite marker by Tandem Repeat Finder software Version 4.07b. Minisatellite marker CH1T1M13779 from chromosome one was applied for genotyping in 88 samples of P. vivax including 2 recurrence cases. Whole genome of P. vivax was scanned and found to have one hundred minisatellite markers. CH1T1M13779 minisatellite marker from chromosome-1 was used for amplification in 88 samples of P. vivax. Of 66 amplified samples, 14 alleles were found with varied allele frequency. The base size of 280 (13.63 %) 320 bp (13.63 %) and 300 bp (16.66 %) showed the predominant allele in the P. vivax population. Genotyping of two paired samples (day 0 and day relapse) could demonstrate the presence of relapse and reinfection. The CH1T1M13779 can be potential minisatellite marker which can be used to differentiate between relapse and new infection of P. vivax strain.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 17%
Student > Master 4 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 10%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Other 5 17%
Unknown 2 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 27%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 10%
Arts and Humanities 1 3%
Other 5 17%
Unknown 2 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 February 2016.
All research outputs
#3,715,285
of 7,289,383 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,655
of 2,432 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#152,308
of 282,588 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#134
of 173 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,289,383 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,432 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,588 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 173 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.