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More than just a bed: mental health service users’ experiences of self-referral admission

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Mental Health Systems, February 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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20 Dimensions

Readers on

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54 Mendeley
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Title
More than just a bed: mental health service users’ experiences of self-referral admission
Published in
International Journal of Mental Health Systems, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13033-016-0045-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Turid Møller Olsø, Camilla Buch Gudde, Inger Elise Opheim Moljord, Gretha Helen Evensen, Dag Øivind Antonsen, Lasse Eriksen

Abstract

Several community mental health centres and mental hospitals in Norway now allow users with a diagnosis of severe mental illness to self-refer for admission. This give a group of service users who are well-known to service providers the opportunity to refer themselves for short inpatient stays without contacting their doctor, a duty doctor or emergency department. Evidence on self-referral admissions is lacking. To explore service users' experiences of having the opportunity to refer themselves for a short inpatient stay. Forty-two qualitative semi-structured interviews were undertaken between 2010 and 2014 in a group of 28 service users with serious mental illness and with or without substance abuse problems. All respondents had a contract which allowed them to self-refer for inpatient treatment. Systematic text condensation was applied in the analyses. Self-referral inpatient admission is more than just a bed. It was perceived as a new, unconventional health service, which differed substantially from earlier experiences of inpatient care and was characterised by different values and treatment principles. The differences were related to the content, quality and organisation of treatment. Having the option to decide about admission for oneself and having access to services focusing on individual needs seem to enhance service users' confidence, both in the services they use and in their own ability to cope with everyday life. Self-referral inpatient admission is a concrete example of how a user involvement policy can be implemented in mental health services. It is important to emphasise that the self-referral admission process described here is an offer in development and that we are awaiting findings from a larger RCT study. More evidence is needed to determine what aspects of the service are helpful to service users, the long-term effects, appropriateness and cost-effectiveness, and how the service can be integrated into the mental health system.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Nigeria 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 52 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 24%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 22%
Researcher 7 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 6%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 6 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 18 33%
Social Sciences 8 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 7%
Decision Sciences 2 4%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 8 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 March 2017.
All research outputs
#3,924,707
of 14,212,551 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Mental Health Systems
#257
of 498 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#76,925
of 267,051 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Mental Health Systems
#5
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,212,551 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 498 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,051 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.