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Modulatory effects of condensed tannin fractions of different molecular weights from a Leucaena leucocephala hybrid on the bovine rumen bacterial…

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, March 2016
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Title
Modulatory effects of condensed tannin fractions of different molecular weights from a Leucaena leucocephala hybrid on the bovine rumen bacterial community in vitro
Published in
Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, March 2016
DOI 10.1002/jsfa.7674
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mookiah Saminathan, Chin Chin Sieo, Han Ming Gan, Sharanya Ravi, Karthikkumar Venkatachalam, Norhani Abdullah, Clemente Michael Vui Ling Wong, Yin Wan Ho

Abstract

Condensed tannin (CT) fractions of different molecular weights (MWs) may affect the rumen microbial metabolism by altering bacterial diversity. In this study, the effects of unfractionated CTs (F0) and five CT fractions (F1-F5) of different MWs (F1=1265.8 Da, F2=1,028.6 Da, F3=652.2 Da, F4=562.2 Da and F5=469.6 Da) from Leucaena leucocephala hybrid-Rendang (LLR) on the structure and diversity of the rumen bacterial community were investigated in vitro. Real-time PCR assay showed that the total bacterial population was not significantly (P > 0.05) different among the dietary treatments. Inclusion of higher-MW CT fractions F1 and F2 significantly (P < 0.05) increased the Fibrobacter succinogens population compared to F0 and CT fractions F3-F5. Although inclusion of F0 and CT fractions (F1-F5) significantly (P < 0.05) decreased the Ruminococcus flavefaciens population, there was no effect on the R. albus population when compared to the control (without CTs). High-throughput sequencing of the V3 region of 16S rRNA showed that the relative abundance of genera Prevotella and unclassified Clostridiales significantly (P < 0.05) decreased, corresponding with increasing MWs of CT fractions, whereas the cellulolytic bacteria of the genus Fibrobacter was significantly (P < 0.05) increased. Inclusion of higher-MW CT fractions F1 and/or F2 decreased the relative abundance of minor genera such as Ruminococcus, Streptococcus, Clostridium XIVa, and Anaeroplasma, but increased the relative abundance of Acinetobacter, Treponema, Selenomonas, Succiniclasticum, and unclassified Spirochaetales compared to the control and lower-MWs CT fractions. This study indicates that CT fractions of different MWs may play an important role in altering the structure and diversity of the rumen bacterial community in vitro, and the impact was more pronounced for CT fractions with higher MW.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 33%
Student > Master 3 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 17%
Unspecified 2 11%
Other 1 6%
Other 3 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 50%
Unspecified 3 17%
Chemistry 2 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 6%
Other 1 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 May 2017.
All research outputs
#9,738,463
of 12,182,743 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
#1,910
of 2,676 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#205,938
of 290,855 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
#56
of 134 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,182,743 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,676 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 290,855 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 134 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.