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Homage to Linnaeus: How many parasites? How many hosts?

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, August 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
twitter
47 tweeters
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
300 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
675 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
connotea
3 Connotea
Title
Homage to Linnaeus: How many parasites? How many hosts?
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, August 2008
DOI 10.1073/pnas.0803232105
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. Dobson, K. D. Lafferty, A. M. Kuris, R. F. Hechinger, W. Jetz

Abstract

Estimates of the total number of species that inhabit the Earth have increased significantly since Linnaeus's initial catalog of 20,000 species. The best recent estimates suggest that there are approximately 6 million species. More emphasis has been placed on counts of free-living species than on parasitic species. We rectify this by quantifying the numbers and proportion of parasitic species. We estimate that there are between 75,000 and 300,000 helminth species parasitizing the vertebrates. We have no credible way of estimating how many parasitic protozoa, fungi, bacteria, and viruses exist. We estimate that between 3% and 5% of parasitic helminths are threatened with extinction in the next 50 to 100 years. Because patterns of parasite diversity do not clearly map onto patterns of host diversity, we can make very little prediction about geographical patterns of threat to parasites. If the threats reflect those experienced by avian hosts, then we expect climate change to be a major threat to the relatively small proportion of parasite diversity that lives in the polar and temperate regions, whereas habitat destruction will be the major threat to tropical parasite diversity. Recent studies of food webs suggest that approximately 75% of the links in food webs involve a parasitic species; these links are vital for regulation of host abundance and potentially for reducing the impact of toxic pollutants. This implies that parasite extinctions may have unforeseen costs that impact the health and abundance of a large number of free-living species.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 47 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 675 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 7 1%
Brazil 5 <1%
Germany 5 <1%
Spain 3 <1%
Australia 3 <1%
Switzerland 2 <1%
Norway 2 <1%
Portugal 2 <1%
Mexico 2 <1%
Other 11 2%
Unknown 633 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 106 16%
Researcher 67 10%
Student > Master 63 9%
Student > Bachelor 47 7%
Professor 23 3%
Other 68 10%
Unknown 301 45%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 257 38%
Environmental Science 50 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 17 3%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 7 1%
Immunology and Microbiology 7 1%
Other 20 3%
Unknown 317 47%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 82. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 May 2019.
All research outputs
#215,860
of 13,947,692 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#4,862
of 81,357 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,928
of 211,783 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#46
of 765 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,947,692 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 81,357 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 211,783 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 765 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.