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Impact of secular trends on sex assessment evaluated through femoral dimensions of the Czech population

Overview of attention for article published in Forensic Science International, May 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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26 Mendeley
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Title
Impact of secular trends on sex assessment evaluated through femoral dimensions of the Czech population
Published in
Forensic Science International, May 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.forsciint.2016.02.042
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pierre Guyomarc’h, Jana Velemínská, Petr Sedlak, Miluše Dobisíková, Iva Švenkrtová, Jaroslav Brůžek

Abstract

Human skeletal variability is influenced by several factors, including genetics, environment, and socio-cultural background. Forensic methods being traditionally based on targeted reference groups, it is recognized that they are population-specific. Additionally, secular trends highly impact on the skeletal morphology, but the effect of outdated methods on forensic cases is not yet well documented. This paper compares the sexual dimorphism of femoral dimensions in two samples from the Czech population separated by 60 years in time (Pachner and the Prague National Museum Collections). Significant secular trends are present within this short span in both sexes and for most of the seven tested linear variables. The consequence of secular trends on sex determination is tested with logistic regression, and a decrease in reliability is systematically observed when using the older Czech sample on the 20th century sample, whichever the set of variables included. A model based on a recent Croatian sample provides a higher reliability on contemporaneous Czech individuals. These results imply that above population specificity, temporal consistency may be a major criterion to fulfil when applying forensic anthropology identification methods.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor > Associate Professor 5 19%
Student > Bachelor 5 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 12%
Other 3 12%
Student > Master 3 12%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 3 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 5 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 12%
Arts and Humanities 3 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 8%
Other 5 19%
Unknown 3 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 March 2016.
All research outputs
#12,651,928
of 16,578,610 outputs
Outputs from Forensic Science International
#2,355
of 3,210 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#174,256
of 268,971 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Forensic Science International
#37
of 96 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,578,610 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,210 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,971 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 96 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.