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Bumblebees minimize control challenges by combining active and passive modes in unsteady winds

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, October 2016
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2 tweeters

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18 Dimensions

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45 Mendeley
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Title
Bumblebees minimize control challenges by combining active and passive modes in unsteady winds
Published in
Scientific Reports, October 2016
DOI 10.1038/srep35043
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sridhar Ravi, Dmitry Kolomenskiy, Thomas Engels, Kai Schneider, Chun Wang, Jörn Sesterhenn, Hao Liu

Abstract

The natural wind environment that volant insects encounter is unsteady and highly complex, posing significant flight-control and stability challenges. It is critical to understand the strategies insects employ to safely navigate in natural environments. We combined experiments on free flying bumblebees with high-fidelity numerical simulations and lower-order modeling to identify the mechanics that mediate insect flight in unsteady winds. We trained bumblebees to fly upwind towards an artificial flower in a wind tunnel under steady wind and in a von Kármán street formed in the wake of a cylinder. Analysis revealed that at lower frequencies in both steady and unsteady winds the bees mediated lateral movement with body roll - typical casting motion. Numerical simulations of a bumblebee in similar conditions permitted the separation of the passive and active components of the flight trajectories. Consequently, we derived simple mathematical models that describe these two motion components. Comparison between the free-flying live and modeled bees revealed a novel mechanism that enables bees to passively ride out high-frequency perturbations while performing active maneuvers at lower frequencies. The capacity of maintaining stability by combining passive and active modes at different timescales provides a viable means for animals and machines to tackle the challenges posed by complex airflows.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 43 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 24%
Researcher 9 20%
Student > Master 8 18%
Student > Postgraduate 5 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 5 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 20 44%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 16%
Physics and Astronomy 3 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 4%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 5 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 March 2016.
All research outputs
#9,151,077
of 14,555,594 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#44,572
of 75,680 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#144,562
of 266,622 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#1,355
of 2,269 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,555,594 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 75,680 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.7. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,622 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,269 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.