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Degradation of the Disease-Associated Prion Protein by a Serine Protease from Lichens

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, May 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
70 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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1 Connotea
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Title
Degradation of the Disease-Associated Prion Protein by a Serine Protease from Lichens
Published in
PLoS ONE, May 2011
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0019836
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christopher J. Johnson, James P. Bennett, Steven M. Biro, Juan Camilo Duque-Velasquez, Cynthia M. Rodriguez, Richard A. Bessen, Tonie E. Rocke

Abstract

The disease-associated prion protein (PrP(TSE)), the probable etiological agent of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), is resistant to degradation and can persist in the environment. Lichens, mutualistic symbioses containing fungi, algae, bacteria and occasionally cyanobacteria, are ubiquitous in the environment and have evolved unique biological activities allowing their survival in challenging ecological niches. We investigated PrP(TSE) inactivation by lichens and found acetone extracts of three lichen species (Parmelia sulcata, Cladonia rangiferina and Lobaria pulmonaria) have the ability to degrade prion protein (PrP) from TSE-infected hamsters, mice and deer. Immunoblots measuring PrP levels and protein misfolding cyclic amplification indicated at least two logs of reductions in PrP(TSE). Degradative activity was not found in closely related lichen species or in algae or a cyanobacterium that inhabit lichens. Degradation was blocked by Pefabloc SC, a serine protease inhibitor, but not inhibitors of other proteases or enzymes. Additionally, we found that PrP levels in PrP(TSE)-enriched preps or infected brain homogenates are also reduced following exposure to freshly-collected P. sulcata or an aqueous extract of the lichen. Our findings indicate that these lichen extracts efficiently degrade PrP(TSE) and suggest that some lichens could have potential to inactivate TSE infectivity on the landscape or be a source for agents to degrade prions. Further work to clone and characterize the protease, assess its effect on TSE infectivity and determine which organism or organisms present in lichens produce or influence the protease activity is warranted.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 2 3%
Mexico 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 66 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 17 24%
Researcher 16 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 19%
Student > Master 7 10%
Professor 6 9%
Other 11 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 36 51%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 19%
Chemistry 4 6%
Environmental Science 3 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 4%
Other 11 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 December 2016.
All research outputs
#802,768
of 12,367,902 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#14,467
of 135,634 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,230
of 226,009 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#390
of 4,175 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,367,902 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 135,634 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 226,009 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,175 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.