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Serum magnesium is inversely associated with coronary artery calcification in the Genetics of Atherosclerotic Disease (GEA) study

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition Journal, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 news outlets
twitter
20 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages

Citations

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24 Dimensions

Readers on

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107 Mendeley
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Title
Serum magnesium is inversely associated with coronary artery calcification in the Genetics of Atherosclerotic Disease (GEA) study
Published in
Nutrition Journal, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12937-016-0143-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rosalinda Posadas-Sánchez, Carlos Posadas-Romero, Guillermo Cardoso-Saldaña, Gilberto Vargas-Alarcón, María Teresa Villarreal-Molina, Nonanzit Pérez-Hernández, José Manuel Rodríguez-Pérez, Aida Medina-Urrutia, Esteban Jorge-Galarza, Juan Gabriel Juárez-Rojas, Margarita Torres-Tamayo

Abstract

Serum magnesium is inversely associated to coronary artery calcification (CAC) in patients with chronic kidney disease. There is little information on this association in a general healthy population. The aim of this study was to examine the cross-sectional association of serum magnesium levels with CAC. We included 1276 Mexican-mestizo subjects (50 % women), aged 30-75 years, free of symptomatic cardiovascular disease. CAC was quantified by multidetector computed tomography using the method described by Agatston. Cross-sectional associations of serum magnesium with cardiometabolic factors and subclinical atherosclerosis defined as a CAC score > 0, were examined in logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, education, smoking status, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, physical activity, elevated abdominal visceral tissue, fasting insulin and glucose, alcohol consumption, menopausal status (women only), low (LDL-C) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides, diuretic use, type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2), and family history of DM2. After full adjustment, subjects in the highest quartile of serum magnesium had 48 % lower odds of hypertension (p = 0.028), 69 % lower odds of DM2 (p = 0.003), and 42 % lower odds of CAC score > 0 (p = 0.016) compared to those with the lowest serum magnesium. The analyses also showed that a 0.17 mg/dL (1SD) increment in serum magnesium was independently associated with 16 % lower CAC (OR 0.84, 95 % CI 0.724-0.986). In a sample of Mexican-mestizo subjects, low serum magnesium was independently associated to higher prevalence not only of hypertension and DM2, but also to coronary artery calcification, which is a marker of atherosclerosis and a predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 107 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 105 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 20 19%
Researcher 17 16%
Student > Master 14 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 9%
Other 17 16%
Unknown 15 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 37 35%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 7%
Psychology 5 5%
Other 12 11%
Unknown 17 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 29. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 February 2017.
All research outputs
#608,347
of 14,009,396 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition Journal
#221
of 1,104 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,493
of 267,377 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,009,396 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,104 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 29.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,377 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them