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Presence of Breeding Birds Improves Body Condition for a Crocodilian Nest Protector

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
53 news outlets
blogs
9 blogs
twitter
59 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Readers on

mendeley
34 Mendeley
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Title
Presence of Breeding Birds Improves Body Condition for a Crocodilian Nest Protector
Published in
PLoS ONE, March 2016
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0149572
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lucas A. Nell, Peter C. Frederick, Frank J. Mazzotti, Kent A. Vliet, Laura A. Brandt

Abstract

Ecological associations where one species enhances habitat for another nearby species (facilitations) shape fundamental community dynamics and can promote niche expansion, thereby influencing how and where species persist and coexist. For the many breeding birds facing high nest-predation pressure, enemy-free space can be gained by nesting near more formidable animals for physical protection. While the benefits to protected species seem well documented, very few studies have explored whether and how protector species are affected by nest protection associations. Long-legged wading birds (Pelecaniformes and Ciconiiformes) actively choose nesting sites above resident American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis), apparently to take advantage of the protection from mammalian nest predators that alligator presence offers. Previous research has shown that wading bird nesting colonies could provide substantial food for alligators in the form of dropped chicks. We compared alligator body condition in similar habitat with and without wading bird nesting colonies present. Alligator morphometric body condition indices were significantly higher in colony than in non-colony locations, an effect that was statistically independent of a range of environmental variables. Since colonially nesting birds and crocodilians co-occur in many tropical and subtropical wetlands, our results highlight a potentially widespread keystone process between two ecologically important species-groups. These findings suggest the interaction is highly beneficial for both groups of actors, and illustrate how selective pressures may have acted to form and reinforce a strongly positive ecological interaction.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 59 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 3%
Mexico 1 3%
Luxembourg 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Unknown 30 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 26%
Student > Bachelor 5 15%
Researcher 3 9%
Other 2 6%
Other 5 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 74%
Environmental Science 6 18%
Computer Science 2 6%
Psychology 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 516. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 June 2016.
All research outputs
#8,257
of 8,589,289 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#216
of 117,819 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#650
of 289,854 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#16
of 5,452 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,589,289 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 117,819 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 289,854 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5,452 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.