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Long-term effects of weight-reducing diets in people with hypertension

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
38 tweeters
facebook
8 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages

Readers on

mendeley
168 Mendeley
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Title
Long-term effects of weight-reducing diets in people with hypertension
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, March 2016
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd008274.pub3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas Semlitsch, Klaus Jeitler, Andrea Berghold, Karl Horvath, Nicole Posch, Stephanie Poggenburg, Andrea Siebenhofer

Abstract

All major guidelines for antihypertensive therapy recommend weight loss. Thus dietary interventions that aim to reduce body weight might be a useful intervention to reduce blood pressure and adverse cardiovascular events associated with hypertension. Primary objectivesTo assess the long-term effects of weight-reducing diets in people with hypertension on all-cause mortality, cardiovascular morbidity, and adverse events (including total serious adverse events, withdrawal due to adverse events, and total non-serious adverse events). Secondary objectivesTo assess the long-term effects of weight-reducing diets in people with hypertension on change from baseline in systolic blood pressure, change from baseline in diastolic blood pressure, and body weight reduction. We obtained studies from computerised searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the Cochrane Hypertension Specialised Register, Ovid MEDLINE, and Ovid EMBASE, and from searches in reference lists, systematic reviews, and the clinical trials registry ClinicalTrials.gov (status as of 2 February 2015). We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of at least 24 weeks' duration that compared weight-reducing dietary interventions to no dietary intervention in adults with primary hypertension. Two review authors independently assessed risk of bias and extracted data. We pooled studies using fixed-effect meta-analysis. In case of moderate or larger heterogeneity as measured by Higgins I(2), we used a random-effects model. This review update did not reveal any new studies, so the number of included studies remained the same: 8 studies involving a total of 2100 participants with high blood pressure and a mean age of 45 to 66 years. Mean treatment duration was 6 to 36 months. We judged the risk of bias as unclear or high for all but two trials. No study included mortality as a predefined outcome. One RCT evaluated the effects of dietary weight loss on a combined endpoint consisting of the necessity of reinstating antihypertensive therapy and severe cardiovascular complications. In this RCT, weight-reducing diet lowered the endpoint compared to no diet: hazard ratio 0.70 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.57 to 0.87). None of the studies evaluated adverse events as designated in our protocol. There was low-quality evidence for a blood pressure reduction in participants assigned to weight loss diets as compared to controls: systolic blood pressure: mean difference (MD) -4.5 mm Hg (95% CI -7.2 to -1.8 mm Hg) (3 of 8 studies included in analysis), and diastolic blood pressure: MD -3.2 mm Hg (95% CI -4.8 to -1.5 mm Hg) (3 of  8  studies included in analysis). There was moderate-quality evidence for weight reduction in dietary weight loss groups as compared to controls: MD -4.0 kg (95% CI -4.8 to -3.2) (5 of 8 studies included in analysis). Two studies used withdrawal of antihypertensive medication as their primary outcome. Even though we did not consider this a relevant outcome for our review, the results of these studies strengthen the finding of reduction of blood pressure by dietary weight loss interventions. In this update, the conclusions remain the same, as we found no new trials. In people with primary hypertension, weight loss diets reduced body weight and blood pressure, however the magnitude of the effects are uncertain due to the small number of participants and studies included in the analyses. Whether weight loss reduces mortality and morbidity is unknown. No useful information on adverse effects was reported in the relevant trials.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 38 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 168 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Norway 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 166 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 40 24%
Student > Bachelor 25 15%
Researcher 21 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 9%
Student > Postgraduate 10 6%
Other 32 19%
Unknown 25 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 57 34%
Nursing and Health Professions 29 17%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 12 7%
Social Sciences 9 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 5%
Other 19 11%
Unknown 34 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 62. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 December 2018.
All research outputs
#350,693
of 15,606,139 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#822
of 11,222 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,668
of 268,771 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#20
of 179 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,606,139 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,222 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,771 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 179 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.