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Hydrologic indicators of hot spots and hot moments of mercury methylation potential along river corridors

Overview of attention for article published in Science of the Total Environment, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets

Citations

dimensions_citation
28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
76 Mendeley
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Title
Hydrologic indicators of hot spots and hot moments of mercury methylation potential along river corridors
Published in
Science of the Total Environment, October 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.03.005
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael Bliss Singer, Lee R. Harrison, Patrick M. Donovan, Joel D. Blum, Mark Marvin-DiPasquale

Abstract

The biogeochemical cycling of metals and other contaminants in river-floodplain corridors is controlled by microbial activity responding to dynamic redox conditions. Riverine flooding thus has the potential to affect speciation of redox-sensitive metals such as mercury (Hg). Therefore, inundation history over a period of decades potentially holds information on past production of bioavailable Hg. We investigate this within a Northern California river system with a legacy of landscape-scale 19th century hydraulic gold mining. We combine hydraulic modeling, Hg measurements in sediment and biota, and first-order calculations of mercury transformation to assess the potential role of river floodplains in producing monomethylmercury (MMHg), a neurotoxin which accumulates in local and migratory food webs. We identify frequently inundated floodplain areas, as well as floodplain areas inundated for long periods. We quantify the probability of MMHg production potential (MPP) associated with hydrology in each sector of the river system as a function of the spatial patterns of overbank inundation and drainage, which affect long-term redox history of contaminated sediments. Our findings identify river floodplains as periodic, temporary, yet potentially important, loci of biogeochemical transformation in which contaminants may undergo change during limited periods of the hydrologic record. We suggest that inundation is an important driver of MPP in river corridors and that the entire flow history must be analyzed retrospectively in terms of inundation magnitude and frequency in order to accurately assess biogeochemical risks, rather than merely highlighting the largest floods or low-flow periods. MMHg bioaccumulation within the aquatic food web in this system may pose a major risk to humans and waterfowl that eat migratory salmonids, which are being encouraged to come up these rivers to spawn. There is a long-term pattern of MPP under the current flow regime that is likely to be accentuated by increasingly common large floods with extended duration.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 76 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 4%
Portugal 1 1%
Unknown 72 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 20 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 22%
Researcher 10 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 4%
Other 6 8%
Unknown 12 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 25 33%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 12 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 13%
Chemistry 5 7%
Engineering 5 7%
Other 6 8%
Unknown 13 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 35. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 March 2016.
All research outputs
#598,588
of 15,557,520 outputs
Outputs from Science of the Total Environment
#448
of 14,355 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,510
of 268,700 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science of the Total Environment
#9
of 223 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,557,520 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,355 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,700 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 223 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.