↓ Skip to main content

The Complexity of Multiple Contraceptive Method Use and the Anxiety That Informs It: Implications for Theory and Practice

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Sexual Behavior, March 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
24 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The Complexity of Multiple Contraceptive Method Use and the Anxiety That Informs It: Implications for Theory and Practice
Published in
Archives of Sexual Behavior, March 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10508-016-0706-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lori Frohwirth, Nakeisha Blades, Ann M. Moore, Heather Wurtz

Abstract

Despite clinical guidelines and national data describing the use of one contraceptive method as the best and most common way to prevent unintended pregnancy, limited evidence indicates a more complex picture of actual contraceptive practice. Face-to-face in-depth interviews were conducted in November of 2013 with a sample of women from two cities in the United States (n = 52). The interviews explored the ways participants used contraception to protect themselves from unintended pregnancy over the past 12 months. Most respondents reported using multiple methods, many of which are considered to be less-effective, within this timeframe. The practice of combining methods in order to increase one's level of protection from pregnancy was prevalent, and was mainly enacted in two ways: by backing up inconsistent method use with other methods and by "buttressing" methods. These practices were found to be more common, and more complex, than previously described in the literature. These behaviors were mainly informed by a deep anxiety about both the efficacy of contraceptive methods, and about respondents' own perceived ability to prevent pregnancy. These findings challenge prevailing assumptions about women's contraceptive method use and have implications for clinical contraceptive counseling practice.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 21%
Student > Bachelor 5 21%
Unspecified 4 17%
Student > Master 3 13%
Student > Postgraduate 2 8%
Other 5 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 7 29%
Social Sciences 7 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 17%
Psychology 3 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 8%
Other 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 29. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 July 2019.
All research outputs
#575,180
of 13,441,268 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Sexual Behavior
#357
of 2,491 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,589
of 268,924 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Sexual Behavior
#7
of 40 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,441,268 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,491 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,924 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 40 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.