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Where do these bugs come from? Phenotypic structure of Triatoma infestans populations after control interventions in the Argentine Chaco

Overview of attention for article published in Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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49 Mendeley
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Title
Where do these bugs come from? Phenotypic structure of Triatoma infestans populations after control interventions in the Argentine Chaco
Published in
Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, April 2015
DOI 10.1590/0074-02760140376
Pubmed ID
Authors

María Sol Gaspe, Yael Mariana Provecho, Romina Valeria Piccinali, Ricardo Esteban Gürtler/

Abstract

House re-invasion by native triatomines after insecticide-based control campaigns represents a major threat for Chagas disease vector control. We conducted a longitudinal intervention study in a rural section (Area III, 407 houses) of Pampa del Indio, northeastern Argentina, and used wing geometric morphometry to compare pre-spray and post-spray (re-infestant bugs) Triatoma infestans populations. The community-wide spraying with pyrethroids reduced the prevalence of house infestation by T. infestans from 31.9% to < 1% during a four-year follow-up, unlike our previous studies in the neighbouring Area I. Two groups of bug collection sites differing in wing shape variables before interventions (including 221 adults from 11 domiciles) were used as a reference for assigning 44 post-spray adults. Wing shape variables from post-spray, high-density bug colonies and pre-spray groups were significantly different, suggesting that re-infestant insects had an external origin. Insects from one house differed strongly in wing shape variables from all other specimens. A further comparison between insects from both areas supported the existence of independent re-infestation processes within the same district. These results point to local heterogeneities in house re-infestation dynamics and emphasise the need to expand the geographic coverage of vector surveillance and control operations to the affected region.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Argentina 2 4%
Unknown 47 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 16%
Researcher 5 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Student > Master 4 8%
Other 11 22%
Unknown 13 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 35%
Unspecified 6 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 2%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 15 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 March 2016.
All research outputs
#6,945,847
of 12,511,869 outputs
Outputs from Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz
#524
of 862 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#114,235
of 269,138 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz
#4
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,511,869 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 862 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,138 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.