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Extinction of fish-shaped marine reptiles associated with reduced evolutionary rates and global environmental volatility

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
66 news outlets
blogs
10 blogs
twitter
65 tweeters
facebook
12 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
8 Google+ users
reddit
2 Redditors

Readers on

mendeley
50 Mendeley
Title
Extinction of fish-shaped marine reptiles associated with reduced evolutionary rates and global environmental volatility
Published in
Nature Communications, March 2016
DOI 10.1038/ncomms10825
Pubmed ID
Authors

Valentin Fischer, Nathalie Bardet, Roger B. J. Benson, Maxim S. Arkhangelsky, Matt Friedman, Fischer, Valentin, Bardet, Nathalie, Benson, Roger, Arkhangelsky, Maxim, Friedman, Matt, Benson, Roger B J, Arkhangelsky, Maxim S

Abstract

Despite their profound adaptations to the aquatic realm and their apparent success throughout the Triassic and the Jurassic, ichthyosaurs became extinct roughly 30 million years before the end-Cretaceous mass extinction. Current hypotheses for this early demise involve relatively minor biotic events, but are at odds with recent understanding of the ichthyosaur fossil record. Here, we show that ichthyosaurs maintained high but diminishing richness and disparity throughout the Early Cretaceous. The last ichthyosaurs are characterized by reduced rates of origination and phenotypic evolution and their elevated extinction rates correlate with increased environmental volatility. In addition, we find that ichthyosaurs suffered from a profound Early Cenomanian extinction that reduced their ecological diversity, likely contributing to their final extinction at the end of the Cenomanian. Our results support a growing body of evidence revealing that global environmental change resulted in a major, temporally staggered turnover event that profoundly reorganized marine ecosystems during the Cenomanian.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 65 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 4%
Sweden 2 4%
Estonia 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Japan 1 2%
Argentina 1 2%
Netherlands 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 40 80%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 32%
Researcher 14 28%
Student > Bachelor 6 12%
Student > Master 4 8%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Other 7 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 20 40%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 34%
Environmental Science 2 4%
Unspecified 2 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 7 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 654. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 June 2017.
All research outputs
#4,487
of 8,241,602 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#71
of 12,842 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#402
of 286,068 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#10
of 860 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,241,602 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,842 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 44.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 286,068 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 860 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.