↓ Skip to main content

Fatores associados à discriminação percebida nos serviços de saúde do Brasil: resultados da Pesquisa Nacional de Saúde, 2013

Overview of attention for article published in Ciência & Saúde Coletiva, February 2016
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
35 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Fatores associados à discriminação percebida nos serviços de saúde do Brasil: resultados da Pesquisa Nacional de Saúde, 2013
Published in
Ciência & Saúde Coletiva, February 2016
DOI 10.1590/1413-81232015212.19412015
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cristiano Siqueira Boccolini, Patricia de Moraes Mello Boccolini, Giseli Nogueira Damacena, Arthur Pate de Souza Ferreira, Célia Landmann Szwarcwald

Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate factors associated with perceived discrimination in the health services of Brazil. It is a population-based epidemiological study using data from the 2013 National Health Survey, which had a complex sample design in three phases. For each domicile sampled, one individual aged 18 or over was selected (resulting in n = 62,202). The outcome analyzed was: Perception of discrimination by doctors or health professionals, suffered in the health services. A logistic regression model was estimated, adjusted for confounding factors. Discrimination was reported by 10.5% of the Brazilian population. The factors most frequently indicated were: lack of money (5.7%); and social class (5.6%). The adjusted model showed that the groups with the highest chance of feeling discriminated against were: women; individuals without complete primary education; non-whites; and those without a health insurance plan. The fact that one-tenth of the Brazilian population reported feeling discriminated against in the health services shows the need for regulation and wide debate in relation to the Brazilian laws that guarantee universal and equal access to the public and private health services.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 35 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 20%
Student > Bachelor 5 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 6%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 6%
Other 7 20%
Unknown 7 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 20%
Social Sciences 7 20%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 6%
Psychology 1 3%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 8 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 March 2016.
All research outputs
#11,151,892
of 12,536,156 outputs
Outputs from Ciência & Saúde Coletiva
#464
of 505 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#223,596
of 267,169 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ciência & Saúde Coletiva
#7
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,536,156 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 505 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,169 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.