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Computer vision syndrome among computer office workers in a developing country: an evaluation of prevalence and risk factors

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, March 2016
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
187 Mendeley
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Title
Computer vision syndrome among computer office workers in a developing country: an evaluation of prevalence and risk factors
Published in
BMC Research Notes, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13104-016-1962-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

P. Ranasinghe, W. S. Wathurapatha, Y. S. Perera, D. A. Lamabadusuriya, S. Kulatunga, N. Jayawardana, P. Katulanda

Abstract

Computer vision syndrome (CVS) is a group of visual symptoms experienced in relation to the use of computers. Nearly 60 million people suffer from CVS globally, resulting in reduced productivity at work and reduced quality of life of the computer worker. The present study aims to describe the prevalence of CVS and its associated factors among a nationally-representative sample of Sri Lankan computer workers. Two thousand five hundred computer office workers were invited for the study from all nine provinces of Sri Lanka between May and December 2009. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic data, symptoms of CVS and its associated factors. A binary logistic regression analysis was performed in all patients with 'presence of CVS' as the dichotomous dependent variable and age, gender, duration of occupation, daily computer usage, pre-existing eye disease, not using a visual display terminal (VDT) filter, adjusting brightness of screen, use of contact lenses, angle of gaze and ergonomic practices knowledge as the continuous/dichotomous independent variables. A similar binary logistic regression analysis was performed in all patients with 'severity of CVS' as the dichotomous dependent variable and other continuous/dichotomous independent variables. Sample size was 2210 (response rate-88.4 %). Mean age was 30.8 ± 8.1 years and 50.8 % of the sample were males. The 1-year prevalence of CVS in the study population was 67.4 %. Female gender (OR: 1.28), duration of occupation (OR: 1.07), daily computer usage (1.10), pre-existing eye disease (OR: 4.49), not using a VDT filter (OR: 1.02), use of contact lenses (OR: 3.21) and ergonomics practices knowledge (OR: 1.24) all were associated with significantly presence of CVS. The duration of occupation (OR: 1.04) and presence of pre-existing eye disease (OR: 1.54) were significantly associated with the presence of 'severe CVS'. Sri Lankan computer workers had a high prevalence of CVS. Female gender, longer duration of occupation, higher daily computer usage, pre-existing eye disease, not using a VDT filter, use of contact lenses and higher ergonomics practices knowledge all were associated with significantly with the presence of CVS. The factors associated with the severity of CVS were the duration of occupation and presence of pre-existing eye disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 187 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 187 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 43 23%
Unspecified 34 18%
Student > Master 30 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 9%
Researcher 15 8%
Other 49 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 69 37%
Unspecified 38 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 34 18%
Engineering 10 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 3%
Other 30 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 January 2018.
All research outputs
#519,882
of 12,368,793 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#60
of 2,765 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,590
of 277,529 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#6
of 112 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,368,793 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,765 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,529 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 112 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.