↓ Skip to main content

Chorea-ballismus with nonketotic hyperglycemia in primary diabetes mellitus.

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Neuroradiology, June 1996
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
112 Dimensions
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Chorea-ballismus with nonketotic hyperglycemia in primary diabetes mellitus.
Published in
American Journal of Neuroradiology, June 1996
Pubmed ID
Authors

P H Lai, R D Tien, M H Chang, M M Teng, C F Yang, H B Pan, C Chen, J F Lirng, K W Kong

Abstract

To describe the neuroimaging (Ct, MR, and single-photon emission CT [SPECT]) findings in a series of patients with chorea-ballismus associated with nonketotic hyperglycemia in primary diabetes mellitus and to correlate the imaging findings with the clinical presentation. The neuroimaging and clinical data from 10 patients with chorea-ballismus associated with nonketotic hyperglycemia in primary diabetes mellitus were evaluated. Family and drug histories, as well as other causes of chorea, were excluded. All 10 patients had CT, 5 also had MR imaging, and 3 had SPECT examinations. Three had follow-up CT and MR imaging studies, and MR findings were correlated with CT findings in 5 cases. Two experienced neuroradiologists, aware of the diagnosis but blinded to the clinical status of the patients, evaluated all images and reached a consensus as to the final interpretation. CT studies in 9 of 10 patients showed a hyperdense putamen and/or caudate nucleus; in 1, the CT findings were normal. T1-weighted MR images in all 5 patients who had MR imaging (including the patient with a normal CT study) showed hyperintense lesions without significant T2 signal alternation at the basal ganglia. In all 3 of the patients who had SPECT studies of the brain, the scans revealed hypoperfusion at corresponding areas. All 3 follow-up studies depicted resolution of the lesions in the abnormal basal ganglia. Increased hypointensity on T2-weighted and gradient-echo T2*-weighted images was also observed in the sequential MR images. In all patients, the initial side of involvement correlated well with the neuroimaging findings. The chorea resolved within 2 days after treatment of the hyperglycemia in 9 patients. In patients with chorea-ballismus associated with nonketotic hyperglycemia in primary diabetes mellitus, CT and T1-weighted MR images show unilateral or bilateral lesions of the putamen and/or caudate. SPECT scans show hypoperfusion. These findings may be related to petechial hemorrhage and/or myelin destruction. Early recognition of these imaging characteristics may facilitate diagnosis of primary diabetes mellitus with hyperglycemia and prompt appropriate therapy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 June 2019.
All research outputs
#7,449,330
of 13,457,898 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Neuroradiology
#1,753
of 3,385 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,005
of 248,145 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Neuroradiology
#41
of 57 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,457,898 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,385 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 248,145 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 57 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.