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Rapid assessment of disaster damage using social media activity

Overview of attention for article published in Science Advances, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
32 news outlets
blogs
7 blogs
twitter
326 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
googleplus
3 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
73 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
254 Mendeley
Title
Rapid assessment of disaster damage using social media activity
Published in
Science Advances, March 2016
DOI 10.1126/sciadv.1500779
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yury Kryvasheyeu, Haohui Chen, Nick Obradovich, Esteban Moro, Pascal Van Hentenryck, James Fowler, Manuel Cebrian

Abstract

Could social media data aid in disaster response and damage assessment? Countries face both an increasing frequency and an increasing intensity of natural disasters resulting from climate change. During such events, citizens turn to social media platforms for disaster-related communication and information. Social media improves situational awareness, facilitates dissemination of emergency information, enables early warning systems, and helps coordinate relief efforts. In addition, the spatiotemporal distribution of disaster-related messages helps with the real-time monitoring and assessment of the disaster itself. We present a multiscale analysis of Twitter activity before, during, and after Hurricane Sandy. We examine the online response of 50 metropolitan areas of the United States and find a strong relationship between proximity to Sandy's path and hurricane-related social media activity. We show that real and perceived threats, together with physical disaster effects, are directly observable through the intensity and composition of Twitter's message stream. We demonstrate that per-capita Twitter activity strongly correlates with the per-capita economic damage inflicted by the hurricane. We verify our findings for a wide range of disasters and suggest that massive online social networks can be used for rapid assessment of damage caused by a large-scale disaster.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 326 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 254 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 2%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
Italy 2 <1%
Bangladesh 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Other 5 2%
Unknown 232 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 85 33%
Researcher 44 17%
Student > Master 38 15%
Student > Postgraduate 21 8%
Unspecified 16 6%
Other 50 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Computer Science 44 17%
Engineering 37 15%
Unspecified 34 13%
Social Sciences 33 13%
Environmental Science 23 9%
Other 83 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 521. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 July 2018.
All research outputs
#12,935
of 12,497,740 outputs
Outputs from Science Advances
#135
of 2,543 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#583
of 268,284 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science Advances
#9
of 130 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,497,740 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,543 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 130.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,284 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 130 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.