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Decreasing translation error rate in Escherichia coli increases protein function

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biotechnology, March 2016
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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

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15 Mendeley
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Title
Decreasing translation error rate in Escherichia coli increases protein function
Published in
BMC Biotechnology, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12896-016-0259-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marina Musa, Miroslav Radman, Anita Krisko

Abstract

Over-expressed native or recombinant proteins are commonly used for industrial and pharmaceutical purposes, as well as for research. Proteins of interest need to be purified in sufficient quantity, quality and specific activity to justify their commercial price and eventual medical use. Proteome quality was previously positively correlated with ribosomal fidelity, but not on a single protein level. Here, we show that decreasing translational error rate increases the activity of single proteins. In order to decrease the amount of enzyme needed for catalysis, we propose an expression system bearing rpsL141 mutation, which confers high ribosomal fidelity. Using alpha-glucosidase (exo-alpha-1,4-glucosidase) and beta-glucanase (beta-D-glucanase) as examples, we show that proteins purified from Escherichia coli bearing rpsL141 mutation have superior activity compared to those purified from wild type E. coli, as well as some commercially available industrial enzymes. Our results indicate that both alpha-glucosidase and beta-glucanase isolated from E. coli bearing rpsL141 mutation have increased activity compared to those isolated from wild type E. coli. Alpha-glucosidase from rpsL141 background has a higher activity than the purchased enzymes, while beta-glucanase from the same background has a higher activity compared to the beta-glucanase purchased from Sigma, but not compared to the one purchased from Megazyme. Reduction of the error rate in protein biosynthesis via ribosomal rpsL141 mutation results in superior functionality of single proteins. We conclude that this is a viable system for expressing proteins with higher activity and that it can be easily scaled up and combined with other expression systems to meet the industrial needs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
China 1 7%
Unknown 14 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 20%
Student > Master 3 20%
Professor 2 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 7%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 40%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 20%
Chemistry 2 13%
Environmental Science 1 7%
Engineering 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 March 2016.
All research outputs
#3,586,361
of 7,396,084 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biotechnology
#254
of 461 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#139,323
of 278,261 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biotechnology
#11
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,396,084 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 461 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,261 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.