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The role of medicinal plants in the treatment of diabetes: a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in Electronic Physician, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
66 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
215 Mendeley
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Title
The role of medicinal plants in the treatment of diabetes: a systematic review
Published in
Electronic Physician, January 2016
DOI 10.19082/1832
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wesam Kooti, Maryam Farokhipour, Zahra Asadzadeh, Damoon Ashtary-Larky, Majid Asadi-Samani

Abstract

Diabetes is a serious metabolic disorder and plenty of medical plants are used in traditional medicines to treat diabetes. These plants have no side effects and many existing medicines are derived from the plants. The purpose of this systematic review is to study diabetes and to summarize the available treatments for this disease, focusing especially on herbal medicine. Required papers about diabetes and effective plants were searched from the databases, including Science direct, PubMed, Wiley, Scopus, and Springer. Keywords in this study are "medicinal plants", "diabetes", "symptom", "herbal", and "treatment". Out of the 490 collected articles (published in the period between 1995 and 2015), 450 were excluded due to non-relevance or lack of access to the original article. Diabetes is mainly due to oxidative stress and an increase in reactive oxygen species that can have major effects. Many plants contain different natural antioxidants, in particular tannins, flavonoids, C and E vitamins that have the ability to maintain β-cells performance and decrease glucose levels in the blood. According to published results, it can be said that medical plants are more affordable and have less side effects compared synthetic drugs, and are more effective in treatment of diabetes mellitus.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 215 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 <1%
Unknown 214 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 41 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 35 16%
Researcher 20 9%
Student > Master 19 9%
Student > Postgraduate 14 7%
Other 44 20%
Unknown 42 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 52 24%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 28 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 24 11%
Chemistry 9 4%
Other 20 9%
Unknown 56 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 September 2020.
All research outputs
#4,831,593
of 15,971,967 outputs
Outputs from Electronic Physician
#53
of 209 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#85,038
of 267,867 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Electronic Physician
#2
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,971,967 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 209 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,867 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.