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Flu shots and the characteristics of unvaccinated elderly Medicare beneficiaries.

Overview of attention for article published in Medicare & Medicaid Research Review, January 2011
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Title
Flu shots and the characteristics of unvaccinated elderly Medicare beneficiaries.
Published in
Medicare & Medicaid Research Review, January 2011
DOI 10.5600/mmrr.001.04.b01
Pubmed ID
Abstract

Data from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey, 2009. • Overall, 73% of Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 years and older reported receiving a flu shot for the 2008 flu season, but vaccination rates varied by socio-demographic characteristics. Flu vaccination was lowest for beneficiaries aged 65-74 years old, who were non-Hispanic Blacks and Hispanics, were not married, had less than a high school education, or who were eligible for Medicaid (i.e., dual eligibles). • Healthcare utilization and personal health behavior were also related to vaccination rates, with current smokers and those with no hospitalizations or physician visits being less likely to be vaccinated. • Among those beneficiaries who reported receiving a flu shot, 59% received it in a physician's office or clinic, with the next most common setting being in the community (21%); e.g., grocery store, shopping mall, library, or church. • Among those beneficiaries who did not receive a flu shot, the most common reasons were beliefs that the shot could cause side effects or disease (20%), that they didn't think the shot could prevent the flu (17%), or that the shot wasn't needed (16%). Less than 1% reported that they didn't get the flu shot because of cost. Elderly persons (aged 65 years and older) are at increased risk of complications from influenza, with the majority of influenza-related hospitalizations and deaths occurring among the elderly (Fiore et al., 2010). Most physicians recommend their elderly patients get a flu shot each year, and many hospitals inquire about elderly patient's immunization status upon admission, providing a vaccination if requested. The importance of getting a flu shot is underscored by the Department of Health and Human Services' Healthy People initiative, which has set a vaccination goal of 90% for the Nation's elderly by the year 2020 (Department of Health and Human Services [DHHS], 2011). Although all costs related to flu shots are covered by Medicare, requiring no co-pay on the part of the beneficiary (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, 2011), for the 2008 flu season, only 73% of non-institutionalized Medicare beneficiaries, aged 65 years and older, reported receiving one. This report presents the most recent data on flu vaccination rates among non-institutionalized elderly Medicare beneficiaries and their association with socio-demographic and personal health characteristics. The report also describes the places beneficiaries received their flu shot and, for those not getting vaccinated, the reasons reported for not doing so.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 4%
Unknown 49 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 20%
Student > Bachelor 9 18%
Student > Master 9 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 6%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 9 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 12%
Social Sciences 4 8%
Psychology 4 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 6%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 13 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 February 2012.
All research outputs
#3,206,696
of 4,009,345 outputs
Outputs from Medicare & Medicaid Research Review
#9
of 16 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#55,663
of 77,699 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Medicare & Medicaid Research Review
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,009,345 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 16 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one scored the same or higher as 7 of them.
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