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Gradual Versus Abrupt Smoking Cessation

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of Internal Medicine, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#3 of 9,649)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
271 news outlets
blogs
8 blogs
twitter
323 tweeters
facebook
45 Facebook pages
googleplus
4 Google+ users
video
1 video uploader

Readers on

mendeley
80 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Gradual Versus Abrupt Smoking Cessation
Published in
Annals of Internal Medicine, March 2016
DOI 10.7326/m14-2805
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicola Lindson-Hawley, Miriam Banting, Robert West, Susan Michie, Bethany Shinkins, Paul Aveyard, Lindson-Hawley, Nicola, Banting, Miriam, West, Robert, Michie, Susan, Shinkins, Bethany, Aveyard, Paul, Lindson-Hawley, N, Banting, M, West, R, Michie, S, Shinkins, B, Aveyard, P

Abstract

Most smoking cessation guidelines advise quitting abruptly. However, many quit attempts involve gradual cessation. If gradual cessation is as successful, smokers can be advised to quit either way. To examine the success of quitting smoking by gradual compared with abrupt quitting. Randomized, controlled noninferiority trial. (International Standardized Randomized Controlled Trial Number Register: ISRCTN22526020). Primary care clinics in England. 697 adult smokers with tobacco addiction. Participants quit smoking abruptly or reduced smoking gradually by 75% in the 2 weeks before quitting. Both groups received behavioral support from nurses and used nicotine replacement before and after quit day. The primary outcome measure was prolonged validated abstinence from smoking 4 weeks after quit day. The secondary outcome was prolonged, validated, 6-month abstinence. At 4 weeks, 39.2% (95% CI, 34.0% to 44.4%) of the participants in the gradual-cessation group were abstinent compared with 49.0% (CI, 43.8% to 54.2%) in the abrupt-cessation group (relative risk, 0.80 [CI, 0.66 to 0.93]). At 6 months, 15.5% (CI, 12.0% to 19.7%) of the participants in the gradual-cessation group were abstinent compared with 22.0% (CI, 18.0% to 26.6%) in the abrupt-cessation group (relative risk, 0.71 [CI, 0.46 to 0.91]). Participants who preferred gradual cessation were significantly less likely to be abstinent at 4 weeks than those who preferred abrupt cessation (38.3% vs 52.2%; P = 0.007). Blinding was impossible. Most participants were white. Quitting smoking abruptly is more likely to lead to lasting abstinence than cutting down first, even for smokers who initially prefer to quit by gradual reduction. British Heart Foundation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 323 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 80 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 2 3%
United States 2 3%
Spain 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 73 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 15%
Student > Postgraduate 11 14%
Other 10 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 10 13%
Other 27 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 43 54%
Psychology 8 10%
Unspecified 7 9%
Social Sciences 4 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 4%
Other 15 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2431. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 June 2018.
All research outputs
#280
of 11,368,836 outputs
Outputs from Annals of Internal Medicine
#3
of 9,649 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17
of 286,473 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of Internal Medicine
#1
of 138 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,368,836 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,649 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 28.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 286,473 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 138 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.