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Beyond just sea‐level rise: considering macroclimatic drivers within coastal wetland vulnerability assessments to climate change

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

policy
2 policy sources
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
177 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
321 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Beyond just sea‐level rise: considering macroclimatic drivers within coastal wetland vulnerability assessments to climate change
Published in
Global Change Biology, November 2015
DOI 10.1111/gcb.13084
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael J. Osland, Nicholas M. Enwright, Richard H. Day, Christopher A. Gabler, Camille L. Stagg, James B. Grace

Abstract

Due to their position at the land-sea interface, coastal wetlands are vulnerable to many aspects of climate change. However, climate change vulnerability assessments for coastal wetlands generally focus solely on sea-level rise without considering the effects of other facets of climate change. Across the globe and in all ecosystems, macroclimatic drivers (e.g., temperature and rainfall regimes) greatly influence ecosystem structure and function. Macroclimatic drivers have been the focus of climate-change related threat evaluations for terrestrial ecosystems, but largely ignored for coastal wetlands. In some coastal wetlands, changing macroclimatic conditions are expected to result in foundation plant species replacement, which would affect the supply of certain ecosystem goods and services and could affect ecosystem resilience. As examples, we highlight several ecological transition zones where small changes in macroclimatic conditions would result in comparatively large changes in coastal wetland ecosystem structure and function. Our intent in this communication is not to minimize the importance of sea-level rise. Rather, our overarching aim is to illustrate the need to also consider macroclimatic drivers within vulnerability assessments for coastal wetlands. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 321 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 317 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 75 23%
Student > Master 57 18%
Researcher 43 13%
Student > Bachelor 29 9%
Professor 18 6%
Other 52 16%
Unknown 47 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 126 39%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 64 20%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 41 13%
Engineering 12 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 2%
Other 17 5%
Unknown 56 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 September 2021.
All research outputs
#3,971,930
of 21,922,222 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#3,480
of 5,488 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,543
of 279,084 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#60
of 92 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,922,222 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,488 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 32.6. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,084 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 92 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.