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Empathy among undergraduate medical students: A multi-centre cross-sectional comparison of students beginning and approaching the end of their course

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Education, March 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)

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10 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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22 Dimensions

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124 Mendeley
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Title
Empathy among undergraduate medical students: A multi-centre cross-sectional comparison of students beginning and approaching the end of their course
Published in
BMC Medical Education, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12909-016-0603-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thelma A Quince, Paul Kinnersley, Jonathan Hales, Ana da Silva, Helen Moriarty, Pia Thiemann, Sarah Hyde, James Brimicombe, Diana Wood, Matthew Barclay, John Benson

Abstract

Although a core element in patient care the trajectory of empathy during undergraduate medical education remains unclear. Empathy is generally regarded as comprising an affective capacity: the ability to be sensitive to and concerned for, another and a cognitive capacity: the ability to understand and appreciate the other person's perspective. The authors investigated whether final year undergraduate students recorded lower levels of empathy than their first year counterparts, and whether male and female students differed in this respect. Between September 2013 and June 2014 an online questionnaire survey was administered to 15 UK, and 2 international medical schools. Participating schools provided both 5-6 year standard courses and 4 year accelerated graduate entry courses. The survey incorporated the Jefferson Scale of Empathy-Student Version (JSE-S) and Davis's Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI), both widely used to measure medical student empathy. Participation was voluntary. Chi squared tests were used to test for differences in biographical characteristics of student groups. Multiple linear regression analyses, in which predictor variables were year of course (first/final); sex; type of course and broad socio-economic group were used to compare empathy scores. Five medical schools (4 in the UK, 1 in New Zealand) achieved average response rates of 55 % (n = 652) among students starting their course and 48 % (n = 487) among final year students. These schools formed the High Response Rate Group. The remaining 12 medical schools recorded lower response rates of 24.0 % and 15.2 % among first and final year students respectively. These schools formed the Lower Response Rate Group. For both male and female students in both groups of schools no significant differences in any empathy scores were found between students starting and approaching the end of their course. Gender was found to significantly predict empathy scores, with females scoring higher than males. Participant male and female medical students approaching the end of their undergraduate education, did not record lower levels of empathy, compared to those at the beginning of their course. Questions remain concerning the trajectory of empathy after qualification and how best to support it through the pressures of starting out in medical practice.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 124 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Pakistan 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 118 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 14%
Unspecified 15 12%
Student > Bachelor 14 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 12 10%
Other 47 38%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 59 48%
Unspecified 25 20%
Psychology 19 15%
Social Sciences 9 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 6%
Other 5 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 September 2017.
All research outputs
#2,972,971
of 13,384,723 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Education
#490
of 1,981 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#63,167
of 265,628 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Education
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,384,723 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,981 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,628 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them