↓ Skip to main content

Cognitive impairment and behavioral disorders in Encephalopathy related to Status Epilepticus during slow Sleep : diagnostic assessment and outcome.

Overview of attention for article published in Epileptic Disorders, June 2019
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
22 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Cognitive impairment and behavioral disorders in Encephalopathy related to Status Epilepticus during slow Sleep : diagnostic assessment and outcome.
Published in
Epileptic Disorders, June 2019
DOI 10.1684/epd.2019.1060
Pubmed ID
Authors

Arzimanoglou, Alexis, Cross, Helen J

Abstract

Encephalopathy related to Status Epilepticus during slow Sleep (ESES) is an age-dependent phenomenon, with usual spontaneous resolution during teenage years. However, cognitive outcome is often more disappointing, with permanent cognitive deficits in the large majority of children seen in later life. Presuming this to be an epileptic encephalopathy, current treatment practices are almost exclusively guided by the effect of the AEDs used on the degree of EEG abnormality in sleep. However, the major goal of therapy in ESES syndrome should in fact be to prevent or reduce associated cognitive and neurodevelopmental deficits. Whether or not the EEG pattern of ESES should be completely suppressed to improve cognition is unknown. Discussions on both diagnostic assessment and outcome of cognitive impairment and behavioral disorders should systematically take into account the complexity of the disorder; not only in terms of the evolution or fluctuations of the EEG patterns but also in relation to the underlying etiologies (at least lesional versus non-lesional) and age at diagnosis. We present a common basic assessment protocol, including the minimum technical requirements for polygraphic recording, and a treatment practice protocol that could both be applied in all centres dealing with this rare form of epilepsy. Such an approach would also allow a comprehensive collection of data prospectively, for a better understanding of the natural evolution of the disorder and an evidence-based evaluation of our practices.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 23%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 14%
Other 2 9%
Professor 1 5%
Student > Bachelor 1 5%
Other 6 27%
Unknown 4 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 23%
Neuroscience 4 18%
Psychology 3 14%
Physics and Astronomy 1 5%
Social Sciences 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 7 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 June 2019.
All research outputs
#13,404,321
of 15,184,829 outputs
Outputs from Epileptic Disorders
#261
of 331 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#221,997
of 265,651 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Epileptic Disorders
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,184,829 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 331 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,651 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.