↓ Skip to main content

Pre-hospital versus in-hospital initiation of cooling for survival and neuroprotection after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, March 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
45 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
84 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Pre-hospital versus in-hospital initiation of cooling for survival and neuroprotection after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, March 2016
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd010570.pub2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jasmin Arrich, Michael Holzer, Christof Havel, Alexandra-Maria Warenits, Harald Herkner

Abstract

Targeted temperature management (also known under 'therapeutic hypothermia', 'induced hypothermia'", or 'cooling') has been shown to be beneficial for neurological outcome in patients who have had successful resuscitation from sudden cardiac arrest, but it remains unclear when this intervention should be initiated. To assess the effects of pre-hospital initiation of cooling on survival and neurological outcome in comparison to in-hospital initiation of cooling for adults with pre-hospital cardiac arrest. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, BIOSIS, and three trials registers from inception to 5 March 2015, and carried out reference checking, citation searching, and contact with study authors to identify additional studies. We searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in adults with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest comparing cooling in the pre-hospital setting to in-hospital cooling. Our primary outcomes were survival and neurological outcome; our secondary outcomes were adverse events, quality of life, and length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) and in the hospital. We used Cochrane's standard methodological procedures. We included seven RCTs (2369 participants randomized) on the induction of pre-hospital cooling in comparison to in-hospital cooling. There was considerable methodological heterogeneity and risk of bias mainly due to deficits in the administration of cooling, therefore we refrained from pooling the results for survival and neurological outcome and we presented the results for each study separately. Adverse events were rare: based on four studies with 1713 adults pre-hospital induction of cooling may increase the risk of cardiac re-arrests. Risk of bias within the seven individual studies was generally moderate. Overall the quality of the evidence was very low. This was mainly driven by inconsistency and low precision. Currently, there is no convincing evidence to clearly delineate beneficial or harmful effects of pre-hospital induction of cooling in comparison to in-hospital induction of cooling. This conclusion is based on very low quality evidence.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 45 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 84 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Chile 1 1%
Mexico 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 80 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 16 19%
Researcher 13 15%
Student > Master 13 15%
Student > Bachelor 12 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 11%
Other 20 24%
Unknown 1 1%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 45 54%
Unspecified 17 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 2%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 2%
Other 10 12%
Unknown 1 1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 36. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 March 2017.
All research outputs
#402,771
of 12,429,094 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#1,106
of 8,598 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,967
of 272,622 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#45
of 154 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,429,094 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,598 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,622 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 154 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.