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Association of common genetic variants in GPCPD1 with scaling of visual cortical surface area in humans

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, February 2012
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Citations

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127 Mendeley
Title
Association of common genetic variants in GPCPD1 with scaling of visual cortical surface area in humans
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, February 2012
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1105829109
Pubmed ID
Authors

T. E. Bakken, J. C. Roddey, S. Djurovic, N. Akshoomoff, D. G. Amaral, C. S. Bloss, B. J. Casey, L. Chang, T. M. Ernst, J. R. Gruen, T. L. Jernigan, W. E. Kaufmann, T. Kenet, D. N. Kennedy, J. M. Kuperman, S. S. Murray, E. R. Sowell, L. M. Rimol, M. Mattingsdal, I. Melle, I. Agartz, O. A. Andreassen, N. J. Schork, A. M. Dale

Abstract

Visual cortical surface area varies two- to threefold between human individuals, is highly heritable, and has been correlated with visual acuity and visual perception. However, it is still largely unknown what specific genetic and environmental factors contribute to normal variation in the area of visual cortex. To identify SNPs associated with the proportional surface area of visual cortex, we performed a genome-wide association study followed by replication in two independent cohorts. We identified one SNP (rs6116869) that replicated in both cohorts and had genome-wide significant association (P(combined) = 3.2 × 10(-8)). Furthermore, a metaanalysis of imputed SNPs in this genomic region identified a more significantly associated SNP (rs238295; P = 6.5 × 10(-9)) that was in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs6116869. These SNPs are located within 4 kb of the 5' UTR of GPCPD1, glycerophosphocholine phosphodiesterase GDE1 homolog (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), which in humans, is more highly expressed in occipital cortex compared with the remainder of cortex than 99.9% of genes genome-wide. Based on these findings, we conclude that this common genetic variation contributes to the proportional area of human visual cortex. We suggest that identifying genes that contribute to normal cortical architecture provides a first step to understanding genetic mechanisms that underlie visual perception.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 127 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 3%
United Kingdom 3 2%
Germany 2 2%
France 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Russia 1 <1%
Unknown 115 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 36 28%
Professor 20 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 16%
Unspecified 12 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 11 9%
Other 28 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 29 23%
Neuroscience 21 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 19 15%
Unspecified 17 13%
Psychology 16 13%
Other 25 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 March 2012.
All research outputs
#7,108,237
of 12,365,005 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#66,471
of 77,326 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#56,857
of 116,662 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#623
of 860 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,365,005 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 77,326 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.1. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 860 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.