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Local and global contributions to hemodynamic activity in mouse cortex

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neurophysiology, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
58 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
98 Mendeley
Title
Local and global contributions to hemodynamic activity in mouse cortex
Published in
Journal of Neurophysiology, June 2016
DOI 10.1152/jn.00125.2016
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. Andrea Pisauro, Andrea Benucci, Matteo Carandini

Abstract

Imaging techniques such as fMRI seek to estimate neural signals in local brain regions through measurements of hemodynamic activity. However, hemodynamic activity is accompanied by large vascular fluctuations of unclear significance. To characterize these fluctuations and their impact on estimates of neural signals, we used optical imaging in visual cortex of awake mice. We found that hemodynamic activity can be expressed as the sum of two components, one local and one global. The local component reflected presumed neural signals driven by visual stimuli in the appropriate retinotopic region. The global component constituted large fluctuations shared by larger cortical regions, which extend beyond visual cortex. These fluctuations varied from trial to trial, but they did not constitute noise: they correlated with pupil diameter, suggesting that they reflect variations in arousal or alertness. Distinguishing local and global contributions to hemodynamic activity may help understand neurovascular coupling and interpret measurements of hemodynamic responses.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 58 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 98 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 2%
United Kingdom 2 2%
France 2 2%
Netherlands 2 2%
Switzerland 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Israel 1 1%
Unknown 87 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 40 41%
Researcher 20 20%
Student > Master 8 8%
Unspecified 6 6%
Student > Postgraduate 5 5%
Other 19 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 38 39%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 21%
Unspecified 10 10%
Engineering 10 10%
Psychology 6 6%
Other 13 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 32. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 October 2016.
All research outputs
#508,823
of 13,216,380 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neurophysiology
#71
of 5,250 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,354
of 265,112 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neurophysiology
#4
of 122 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,216,380 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,250 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,112 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 122 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.