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Melanoma patterns of distant relapse: a study of 108 cases from a South Brazilian center

Overview of attention for article published in Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia, February 2016
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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11 Mendeley
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Title
Melanoma patterns of distant relapse: a study of 108 cases from a South Brazilian center
Published in
Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia, February 2016
DOI 10.1590/abd1806-4841.20163722
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rodrigo Kraft Rovere, Maria Eduarda Pires de Souza, Danielle Louise da Maia Cidral, Sara Fernanda Hilgert, Yasmine Rodrigues Chamse Ddine, Carlos Efrain Stein, Giuliano Santos Borges, Adma Silva de Lima

Abstract

The incidence of cutaneous melanoma has increased over the last decades. Recurrences occur most frequently within the first 2-3 years after diagnosis but patients carry a lifelong risk of relapse. Nevertheless, there is no consensus in the literature on what screening tests patients should undergo. To evaluate the most common melanoma metastasis sites among a South Brazilian population from a city with one of the highest melanoma rates, and establish the best screening method for these patients. A cross-sectional retrospective study of 108 consecutive melanoma patients followed up at a center from 2009 to 2013. Data were collected on demographic and tumoral characteristics, as well as the site of the first diagnosed metastasis. Patients were divided into 3 groups for analytical purposes: Non-visceral metastases (48% of patients), visceral metastasis (39%) and brain metastasis (13%). We tried to correlate age, gender, mean Breslow thickness, mitosis and death rates with the aforementioned groups but none showed any statistically significant association. Melanoma patients must be monitored to detect early relapse and subsequent effective treatment but the best follow-up strategy remains to be established.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 36%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 9%
Lecturer 1 9%
Researcher 1 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 9%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 45%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 9%
Unknown 3 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 March 2016.
All research outputs
#15,364,458
of 22,856,968 outputs
Outputs from Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia
#432
of 899 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#233,889
of 397,393 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia
#4
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,856,968 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 899 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 397,393 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.