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Towards Web-based representation and processing of health information

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Health Geographics, January 2009
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Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Readers on

mendeley
79 Mendeley
citeulike
4 CiteULike
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Title
Towards Web-based representation and processing of health information
Published in
International Journal of Health Geographics, January 2009
DOI 10.1186/1476-072x-8-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sheng Gao, Darka Mioc, Xiaolun Yi, Francois Anton, Eddie Oldfield, David J Coleman

Abstract

There is great concern within health surveillance, on how to grapple with environmental degradation, rapid urbanization, population mobility and growth. The Internet has emerged as an efficient way to share health information, enabling users to access and understand data at their fingertips. Increasingly complex problems in the health field require increasingly sophisticated computer software, distributed computing power, and standardized data sharing. To address this need, Web-based mapping is now emerging as an important tool to enable health practitioners, policy makers, and the public to understand spatial health risks, population health trends and vulnerabilities. Today several web-based health applications generate dynamic maps; however, for people to fully interpret the maps they need data source description and the method used in the data analysis or statistical modeling. For the representation of health information through Web-mapping applications, there still lacks a standard format to accommodate all fixed (such as location) and variable (such as age, gender, health outcome, etc) indicators in the representation of health information. Furthermore, net-centric computing has not been adequately applied to support flexible health data processing and mapping online.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 79 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 5 6%
United States 4 5%
India 3 4%
Sweden 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Australia 1 1%
Thailand 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
Kenya 1 1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 61 77%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 21 27%
Student > Master 15 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 8%
Other 11 14%
Unknown 5 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 28%
Computer Science 15 19%
Social Sciences 10 13%
Engineering 7 9%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 4%
Other 14 18%
Unknown 8 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 February 2012.
All research outputs
#2,018,377
of 3,627,387 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Health Geographics
#147
of 246 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#32,053
of 75,419 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Health Geographics
#5
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,627,387 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 246 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 75,419 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.