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Effect of dietary restriction and subsequent re-alimentation on the transcriptional profile of hepatic tissue in cattle

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, March 2016
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Title
Effect of dietary restriction and subsequent re-alimentation on the transcriptional profile of hepatic tissue in cattle
Published in
BMC Genomics, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12864-016-2578-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kate Keogh, David A. Kenny, Paul Cormican, Alan K. Kelly, Sinead M. Waters

Abstract

Compensatory growth (CG) is an accelerated growth phenomenon observed in animals upon re-alimentation following a period of dietary restriction. It is typically utilised in livestock systems to reduce feed costs during periods of reduced feed availability. The biochemical mechanisms controlling this phenomenon, however, are yet to be elucidated. This study aimed to uncover the molecular mechanisms regulating the hepatic expression of CG in cattle, utilising RNAseq. RNAseq was performed on hepatic tissue of bulls following 125 days of dietary restriction (RES) and again following 55 days of subsequent re-alimentation during which the animals exhibited significant CG. The data were compared with those of control animals offered the same diet on an ad libitum basis throughout (ADLIB). Elucidation of the molecular control of CG may yield critical information on genes and pathways which could be targeted as putative molecular biomarkers for the selection of animals with improved CG potential. Following a period of differential feeding, body-weight and liver weight were 161 and 4 kg higher, respectively, for ADLIB compared with RES animals. At this time RNAseq analysis of liver tissue revealed 1352 significantly differentially expressed genes (DEG) between the two treatments. DEGs indicated down-regulation of processes including nutrient transport, cell division and proliferation in RES. In addition, protein synthesis genes were up-regulated in RES following a period of restricted feeding. The subsequent 55 days of ad libitum feeding for both groups resulted in the body-weight difference reduced to 84 kg, with no difference in liver weight between treatment groups. At the end of 55 days of unrestricted feeding, 49 genes were differentially expressed between animals undergoing CG and their continuously fed counterparts. In particular, hepatic expression of cell proliferation and growth genes were greater in animals undergoing CG. Greater expression of cell cycle and cell proliferation genes during CG was associated with a 100 % recovery of liver weight during re-alimentation. Additionally, an apparent up-regulation in capacity for cellular protein synthesis during restricted feeding may contribute to and sustain CG during re-alimentation. DEGs identified are potential candidate genes for the identification of biomarkers for CG, which may be incorporated into future breeding programmes.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 20%
Researcher 4 20%
Student > Bachelor 2 10%
Professor 2 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 5%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 5 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 40%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Engineering 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 7 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 March 2016.
All research outputs
#6,412,170
of 7,408,484 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#4,826
of 5,427 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#236,396
of 279,899 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#196
of 217 outputs
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