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Are algal genes in nonphotosynthetic protists evidence of historical plastid endosymbioses?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, January 2009
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2 tweeters

Citations

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69 Dimensions

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76 Mendeley
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Title
Are algal genes in nonphotosynthetic protists evidence of historical plastid endosymbioses?
Published in
BMC Genomics, January 2009
DOI 10.1186/1471-2164-10-484
Pubmed ID
Authors

John W Stiller, Jinling Huang, Qin Ding, Jing Tian, Carol Goodwillie

Abstract

How photosynthetic organelles, or plastids, were acquired by diverse eukaryotes is among the most hotly debated topics in broad scale eukaryotic evolution. The history of plastid endosymbioses commonly is interpreted under the "chromalveolate" hypothesis, which requires numerous plastid losses from certain heterotrophic groups that now are entirely aplastidic. In this context, discoveries of putatively algal genes in plastid-lacking protists have been cited as evidence of gene transfer from a photosynthetic endosymbiont that subsequently was lost completely. Here we examine this evidence, as it pertains to the chromalveolate hypothesis, through genome-level statistical analyses of similarity scores from queries with two diatoms, Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana, and two aplastidic sister taxa, Phytophthora ramorum and P. sojae.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 76 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 3%
France 2 3%
United States 2 3%
Canada 2 3%
United Kingdom 2 3%
Czechia 2 3%
Brazil 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
Unknown 62 82%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 25 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 20%
Student > Master 8 11%
Professor 7 9%
Student > Bachelor 6 8%
Other 9 12%
Unknown 6 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 56 74%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 8%
Environmental Science 2 3%
Computer Science 1 1%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 1%
Other 4 5%
Unknown 6 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 May 2019.
All research outputs
#9,197,834
of 15,010,975 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#4,901
of 8,607 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#68,860
of 123,270 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,010,975 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,607 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 123,270 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them