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Phylogenetic characterization of the first Ungulate tetraparvovirus 2 detected in pigs in Brazil

Overview of attention for article published in Brazilian Journal of Microbiology, April 2016
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Title
Phylogenetic characterization of the first Ungulate tetraparvovirus 2 detected in pigs in Brazil
Published in
Brazilian Journal of Microbiology, April 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.bjm.2016.01.025
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carine Kunzler Souza, André Felipe Streck, Karla Ratje Gonçalves, Luciane Dubina Pinto, Ana Paula Ravazzolo, David Emílio dos Santos Neves de Barcellos, Cláudio Wageck Canal

Abstract

Ungulate tetraparvovirus 2 (UTV2), formerly known as porcine hokovirus due to its discovery in Hong Kong, is closely related to a Primate tetraparvovirus (human PARV-4) and Ungulate tetraparvovirus 1 (bovine hokovirus). Until now, UTV2 was detected in European, Asian and North American countries, but its occurrence in Latin America is still unknown. This study describes the first report of UTV2 in Brazil, as well as its phylogenetic characterization. Tissue samples (lymph node, lung, liver, spleen and kidney) of 240 piglets from eight different herds (30 animals each herd) were processed for DNA extraction. UTV2 DNA was detected by PCR and the entire VP1/VP2 gene was sequenced for phylogenetic analysis. All pigs from this study displayed postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS). UTV2 was detected in 55.3% of the samples distributed in the variety of porcine tissues investigated, as well as detected in almost all herds, with one exception. The phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that Brazilian UTV2 sequences were more closely related to sequences from Europe and United States.

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The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 27%
Professor 1 9%
Student > Bachelor 1 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 9%
Other 2 18%
Unknown 2 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 27%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 18%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 9%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 March 2016.
All research outputs
#10,978,481
of 12,355,257 outputs
Outputs from Brazilian Journal of Microbiology
#295
of 363 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#231,301
of 275,974 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brazilian Journal of Microbiology
#12
of 15 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 363 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.