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Organic contaminants in Great Lakes tributaries: Prevalence and potential aquatic toxicity

Overview of attention for article published in Science of the Total Environment, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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51 Dimensions

Readers on

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116 Mendeley
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Title
Organic contaminants in Great Lakes tributaries: Prevalence and potential aquatic toxicity
Published in
Science of the Total Environment, June 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.02.137
Pubmed ID
Authors

Austin K. Baldwin, Steven R. Corsi, Laura A. De Cicco, Peter L. Lenaker, Michelle A. Lutz, Daniel J. Sullivan, Kevin D. Richards

Abstract

Organic compounds used in agriculture, industry, and households make their way into surface waters through runoff, leaking septic-conveyance systems, regulated and unregulated discharges, and combined sewer overflows, among other sources. Concentrations of these organic waste compounds (OWCs) in some Great Lakes tributaries indicate a high potential for adverse impacts on aquatic organisms. During 2010-13, 709 water samples were collected at 57 tributaries, together representing approximately 41% of the total inflow to the lakes. Samples were collected during runoff and low-flow conditions and analyzed for 69 OWCs, including herbicides, insecticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, plasticizers, antioxidants, detergent metabolites, fire retardants, non-prescription human drugs, flavors/fragrances, and dyes. Urban-related land cover characteristics were the most important explanatory variables of concentrations of many OWCs. Compared to samples from nonurban watersheds (<15% urban land cover) samples from urban watersheds (>15% urban land cover) had nearly four times the number of detected compounds and four times the total sample concentration, on average. Concentration differences between runoff and low-flow conditions were not observed, but seasonal differences were observed in atrazine, metolachlor, DEET, and HHCB concentrations. Water quality benchmarks for individual OWCs were exceeded at 20 sites, and at 7 sites benchmarks were exceeded by a factor of 10 or more. The compounds with the most frequent water quality benchmark exceedances were the PAHs benzo[a]pyrene, pyrene, fluoranthene, and anthracene, the detergent metabolite 4-nonylphenol, and the herbicide atrazine. Computed estradiol equivalency quotients (EEQs) using only nonsteroidal endocrine-active compounds indicated medium to high risk of estrogenic effects (intersex or vitellogenin induction) at 10 sites. EEQs at 3 sites were comparable to values reported in effluent. This multifaceted study is the largest, most comprehensive assessment of the occurrence and potential effects of OWCs in the Great Lakes Basin to date.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 116 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 115 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 29 25%
Researcher 15 13%
Student > Bachelor 13 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 8%
Other 17 15%
Unknown 22 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 32 28%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 13%
Engineering 12 10%
Chemistry 9 8%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 3%
Other 11 9%
Unknown 33 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 October 2017.
All research outputs
#4,142,357
of 15,557,520 outputs
Outputs from Science of the Total Environment
#4,110
of 14,355 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#75,438
of 268,383 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science of the Total Environment
#60
of 199 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,557,520 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,355 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,383 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 199 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.